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  • Christopher Gell, Volker Bormuth, +14 authors Jonathon Howard
  • 2010
In vitro assays that reconstitute the dynamic behavior of microtubules provide insight into the roles of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in regulating the growth, shrinkage, and catastrophe of microtubules. The use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescently labeled tubulin and MAPs has allowed us to study microtubule(More)
Recent developments in optical microscopy and nanometer tracking have facilitated our understanding of microtubules and their associated proteins. Using fluorescence microscopy, dynamic interactions are now routinely observed in vitro on the level of single molecules, mainly using a geometry in which labeled motors move on surface-immobilized microtubules.(More)
Owing to their wide spectrum of in vivo functions, motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, show great potential for application as nanomachines in engineered environments. When attached to a substrate surface, these motors are envisioned to shuttle cargo that is bound to reconstituted microtubules--one component of the cell cytoskeleton--from one location to(More)
Kinesin-1 motor proteins walk parallel to the protofilament axes of microtubules as they step from one tubulin dimer to the next. Is protofilament tracking an inherent property of processive kinesin motors, like kinesin-1, and what are the structural determinants underlying protofilament tracking? To address these questions, we investigated the tracking(More)
Single-molecule experiments have been used with great success to explore the mechanochemical cycles of processive motor proteins such as kinesin-1, but it has proven difficult to apply these approaches to nonprocessive motors. Therefore, the mechanochemical cycle of kinesin-14 (ncd) is still under debate. Here, we use the readout from the collective(More)
Knowledge about the three-dimensional stepping of motor proteins on the surface of microtubules (MTs) as well as the torsional components in their power strokes can be inferred from longitudinal MT rotations in gliding motility assays. In previous studies, optical detection of these rotations relied on the tracking of rather large optical probes present on(More)
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