Bernd Wissinger

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Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most prevalent hereditary optic neuropathy resulting in progressive loss of visual acuity, centrocoecal scotoma and bilateral temporal atrophy of the optic nerve with an onset within the first two decades of life. The predominant locus for this disorder (OPA1; MIM 165500) has been mapped to a 1.4-cM interval on(More)
Mutations in OPA1, a dynamin-related GTPase involved in mitochondrial fusion, cristae organization and control of apoptosis, have been linked to non-syndromic optic neuropathy transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait (DOA). We here report on eight patients from six independent families showing that mutations in the OPA1 gene can also be responsible for a(More)
We and others have shown recently that mutations in the OPA1 gene encoding a dynamin-related mitochondrial protein cause autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) linked to chromosome 3q28-q29. Here we report screening of the OPA1 gene in a sample of 78 independent ADOA families. OPA1 mutations were identified in 25 patients (detection rate 32.1%) including(More)
We recently showed that mutations in the CNGA3 gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel cause autosomal recessive complete achromatopsia linked to chromosome 2q11. We now report the results of a first comprehensive screening for CNGA3 mutations in a cohort of 258 additional independent families with hereditary cone(More)
We identified three consanguineous Austrian kindreds with 15 members affected by autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy, a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. A whole-genome scan by microarray analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ref. 2) identified a founder(More)
Mutations in the crumbs homologue 1 (CRB1) gene cause a specific form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) that is designated "RP12" and is characterized by a preserved para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE) and by severe loss of vision at age <20 years. Because of the early onset of disease in patients who have RP with PPRPE, we considered CRB1 to be a(More)
Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive disorder featuring total colour blindness, photophobia, reduced visual acuity and nystagmus. While mutations in the CNGA3 gene on chromosome 2q11 are responsible for achromatopsia in a subset of patients, previous linkage studies have localized another achromatopsia locus, ACHM3, on chromosome 8q21. Using(More)
X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (XLCSNB) is characterized by impaired scotopic vision with associated ocular symptoms such as myopia, hyperopia, nystagmus and reduced visual acuity. Genetic mapping in families with XLCSNB revealed two different loci on the proximal short arm of the X chromosome. These two genetic subtypes can be distinguished(More)
Total colourblindness (OMIM 216900), also referred to as rod monochromacy (RM) or complete achromatopsia, is a rare, autosomal recessive inherited and congenital disorder characterized by photophobia, reduced visual acuity, nystagmus and the complete inability to discriminate between colours. Electroretinographic recordings show that in RM, rod(More)
Hereditary retinal dystrophies (RD) constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different forms of RD can be caused by mutations in >100 genes, including >1600 exons. Consequently, next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are among the most promising approaches to(More)