Benjamin Falcon

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Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread(More)
Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease, and there are no mechanism-based therapies. The disease is defined by the presence of abundant neurofibrillary lesions and neuritic plaques in the cerebral cortex. Neurofibrillary lesions comprise paired helical and straight tau filaments, whereas tau filaments with different morphologies(More)
The abnormal aggregation of a small number of known proteins underlies the most common human neurodegenerative diseases. In tauopathies and synucleinopathies, the normally soluble intracellular proteins tau and α-synuclein become insoluble and filamentous. In recent years, non-cell autonomous mechanisms of aggregate formation have come to the fore,(More)
Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At IFPA Meeting 2010 there were twelve themed workshops, six of which are summarized in this report. 1. The immunology workshop focused on normal and pathological functions of the maternal immune system in pregnancy. 2. The transport workshop dealt with regulation of ion and water transport across(More)
The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders are associated with the cytoplasmic aggregation of microtubule-associated protein tau. Recent evidence supports transcellular transfer of tau misfolding (seeding) as the mechanism of spread within an affected brain, a process reminiscent of viral infection. However, whereas microbial pathogens(More)
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