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The First Key Symposium was held in Stockholm, Sweden, 2-5 September 2003. The aim of the symposium was to integrate clinical and epidemiological perspectives on the topic of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). A multidisciplinary, international group of experts discussed the current status and future directions of MCI, with regard to clinical presentation,(More)
The field of aging and dementia is focusing on the characterization of the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. Recent research has identified a transitional state between the cognitive changes of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Mild cognitive impairment refers to the clinical condition between normal(More)
The present study evaluated the clinical course of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the pattern of electroencephalography (EEG) changes following cognitive deterioration, as well as the potential of neurophysiological measures in predicting dementia. Twenty-seven subjects with MCI were followed for a mean follow up period of 21 months.(More)
Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow (H2(15)O method) in groups of young and older adults during implicit and explicit retrieval, following a procedure devised by Squire et al. (1992). At study, subjects were exposed to four lists of words. Following list presentation, subjects were presented with three-letter word(More)
Mutations at codon 717 in exon 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene have previously been shown to segregate with early onset Alzheimer's disease in some families. We have identified a double mutation at codons 670 and 671 (APP 770 transcript) in exon 16 which co-segregates with the disease in two large (probably related) early-onset(More)
BACKGROUND Physical activity may help maintain cognitive function and decrease dementia risk, but epidemiological findings remain controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the subsequent development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS Participants were(More)
BACKGROUND Since the measurement of human cerebral glucose metabolism (GluM) by positron emission tomography (PET) and that of human cerebral electrical activity by EEG reflect synaptic activity, both methods should be related in their cerebral spatial distribution. Healthy subjects do indeed demonstrate similar metabolic and neuroelectric spatial patterns.(More)
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Research into Alzheimer's disease therapy has been at least partly successful in terms of developing symptomatic treatments, but has also had several failures in terms of developing disease-modifying therapies. These successes and failures have led to debate about the potential(More)
OBJECTIVES To study the diagnostic potential of the 42 amino acid form of beta-amyloid (beta-amyloid(1-42)) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biochemical marker for Alzheimer disease (AD), the intra-individual biological variation of CSF-beta-amyloid(1-42) level in patients with AD, and the possible effects of differential binding between beta-amyloid and(More)
CONTEXT Small single-center studies have shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers may be useful to identify incipient Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but large-scale multicenter studies have not been conducted. OBJECTIVE To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CSF beta-amyloid(1-42) (Abeta42), total tau(More)