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In 2010, we teamed with AORN to repeat a simple web-based survey on surgical smoke control practices first conducted in 2007. This survey of AORN members assessed the level of compliance with established surgical smoke control measures (ie, use of wall suction with an in-line particulate filter, use of a smoke evacuator, use of an N95 or other National(More)
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, conducted a simple, web-based survey of AORN members to evaluate surgical smoke control practices. Survey respondents from various medical specialties and facilities throughout North America indicated their facilities' level of compliance with established surgical smoke control measures. Survey(More)
Health care laser systems offer general laser hazards and additional specific concerns unique to the clinical environment. A formal laser hazard evaluation procedure provides an efficient mechanism for identifying potential laser safety hazards. This paper outlines such a medical laser hazard evaluation program and highlights the unique characteristics of(More)
Laser safety often receives less attention and fewer resources than other institutional safety and health program elements. This diminished support occurs despite the fact that the potential for laser-related occupational injuries is much greater than the potential for injury from radioactive materials used in biomedical research. Therefore, a small(More)
Industry consensus guidance and good health physics practice dictate laser entryway safety controls for laboratories housing Class 4 laser controlled areas. The design and installation of an effective laser entryway safety control system presents several technical, administrative, and funding challenges. These challenges prompted the Radiation Safety Office(More)
This paper compares the performance of two methodologies, oxidation and gel suspension, for measuring the 3H and 14C specific activity in incinerator ash and lime. The two methods were judged on the basis of the count time needed to achieve a specified minimum detectable concentration. Both methods involve pretreatment of the sample matrix followed by(More)
Providing nuclide-specific radiation safety information to radioactive material users constitutes a primary role for the institutional health physicist. Often radioactive material vendors' safety literature fills this need, but may leave out key information (e.g., site-specific requirements) that the radiation safety program would like to convey. Instead,(More)
By collecting images of heritage assets from members of the public and processing them to create 3D-reconstructed models, the HeritageTogether project has accomplished the digital recording of nearly 80 sites across Wales, UK. A large amount of data has been collected and produced in the form of photographs, 3D models, maps, condition reports, and more.(More)
Laser safety often receives less attention and fewer resources than other institutional safety and health program elements. This diminished support occurs despite the fact that laser-related occupational injuries and deaths greatly exceed those caused by biomedical research use of radioactive material. Therefore, a small emphasis on laser safety can(More)