Learn More
PD-1 is an immunoinhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells. Mice deficient in PD-1 exhibit a breakdown of peripheral tolerance and demonstrate multiple autoimmune features. We report here that the ligand of PD-1 (PD-L1) is a member of the B7 gene family. Engagement of PD-1 by PD-L1 leads to the inhibition of T cell(More)
Interactions between PD-1 and its two differentially expressed ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, attenuate T cell activation and effector function. To determine the role of these molecules in autoimmune disease of the CNS, PD-1-/-, PD-L1-/- and PD-L2-/- mice were generated and immunized to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). PD-1-/- and PD-L1-/-(More)
T cell immunity directed against tumor-encoded amino acid substitutions occurs in some melanoma patients. This implicates missense mutations as a source of patient-specific neoantigens. However, a systematic evaluation of these putative neoantigens as targets of antitumor immunity is lacking. Moreover, it remains unknown whether vaccination can augment such(More)
The B7 family consists of structurally related, cell-surface protein ligands, which bind to receptors on lymphocytes that regulate immune responses. Activation of T and B lymphocytes is initiated by engagement of cell-surface, antigen-specific T-cell receptors or B-cell receptors, but additional signals delivered simultaneously by B7 ligands determine the(More)
T cell activation through the T cell receptor (TCR) involves partitioning of receptors into discrete membrane compartments known as lipid rafts, and the formation of an immunological synapse (IS) between the T cell and antigen-presenting cell (APC). Compartmentalization of negative regulators of T cell activation such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated(More)
CD4 T cells activated in vitro by anti-CD3/28-coated beads are resistant to infection by CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-dependent HIV-1 isolates. In vivo, antigen-presenting cells (APCs) activate CD4 T cells in part by signaling through the T cell receptor and CD28, yet cells stimulated in this manner are susceptible to HIV-1 infection. We show that(More)
Dendritic cells (DCs) are widely considered as the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in mammals and hence have been extensively harnessed for the development of anticancer vaccines. 1 In spite of such an intense wave of investigation , DC-based anticancer vaccines, which mainly rely on monocyte-derived DCs expanded ex vivo, have yielded low(More)
New DNA sequencing platforms have revolutionized human genome sequencing. The dramatic advances in genome sequencing technologies predict that the $1,000 genome will become a reality within the next few years. Applied to cancer, the availability of cancer genome sequences permits real-time decision-making with the potential to affect diagnosis, prognosis,(More)
Cancer immunotherapy has gained significant momentum from recent clinical successes of checkpoint blockade inhibition. Massively parallel sequence analysis suggests a connection between mutational load and response to this class of therapy. Methods to identify which tumor-specific mutant peptides (neoantigens) can elicit anti-tumor T cell immunity are(More)
Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary(More)
  • 1