Bas H. J. Peeters

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We construct the path integral for one-dimensional non-linear sigma models, starting from a given Hamiltonian operator and states in a Hilbert space. By explicit evaluation of the discretized propagators and vertices we find the correct Feynman rules which differ from those often assumed. These rules, which we previously derived in bosonic systems [1], are(More)
We construct a class of intersecting brane solutions with horizon geometries of the form adS k × S l × S m × E n. We describe how all these solutions are connected through the addition of a wave and/or monopoles. All solutions exhibit supersymmetry enhancement near the horizon. Furthermore we argue that string theory on these spaces is dual to specific(More)
We consider a series of duality transformations that leads to a constant shift in the harmonic functions appearing in the description of a configuration of branes. This way, for several intersections of branes, we can relate the original brane configuration which is asymptotically flat to a geometry which is locally isometric to adS k × E l × S m. These(More)
By carefully analyzing the relations between operator methods and the discretized and continuum path integral formulations of quantum-mechanical systems, we have found the correct Feynman rules for one-dimensional path integrals in curved spacetime. Although the prescription how to deal with the products of distributions that appear in the computation of(More)
We consider a series of duality transformations that leads to a constant shift in the harmonic functions appearing in the description of a configuration of branes. This way, for several intersections of branes, we can relate the original brane configuration which is asymptotically flat to a geometry of the type adS k × E l × S m. The implications of our(More)
This paper presents a prototype development that uses wireless communication protocols and digital sensors in combination with a commercially available data acquisition system to perform physical prototype testing. Three relevant industrial applications are thereby reported to the aim of proving that using wireless sensors can help speed up complex testing(More)
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