Bart J. Currie

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Melioidosis, caused by the gram-negative saprophyte Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a disease of public health importance in southeast Asia and northern Australia that is associated with high case-fatality rates in animals and humans. It has the potential for epidemic spread to areas where it is not endemic, and sporadic case reports elsewhere in the world(More)
In a prospective study of melioidosis in northern Australia, 252 cases were found over 10 years. Of these, 46% were bacteremic, and 49 (19%) patients died. Despite administration of ceftazidime or carbapenems, mortality was 86% (43 of 50 patients) among those with septic shock. Pneumonia accounted for 127 presentations (50%) and genitourinary infections for(More)
A prospective population-based study was conducted in Australia and New Zealand during 1994-1997 to elucidate the epidemiology of cryptococcosis due to Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans (CNVN) and C. neoformans var. gattii (CNVG) and to relate clinical manifestations to host immune status and cryptococcal variety. The mean annual incidence per 10(6)(More)
BACKGROUND Over 20 years, from October 1989, the Darwin prospective melioidosis study has documented 540 cases from tropical Australia, providing new insights into epidemiology and the clinical spectrum. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS The principal presentation was pneumonia in 278 (51%), genitourinary infection in 76 (14%), skin infection in 68 (13%), bacteremia(More)
Utilising three hypervariable microsatellite markers we have previously shown that scabies mites on people are genetically distinct from those on dogs in sympatric populations in northern Australia. This had important ramifications on the formulation of public health control policies. In contrast phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial markers on scabies(More)
While Southeast Asia and northern Australia are well recognized as the major endemic regions for melioidosis, recent reports have expanded the endemic zone. Severe weather events and environmental disasters such as the 2004 Asian tsunami have unmasked locations of sporadic cases and have reconfirmed endemicity in Indonesia. The endemic region now includes(More)
Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in asymptomatic seroconversion, a single skin lesion that may or may not heal spontaneously, a pneumonia which can be subacute or chronic and mimic tuberculosis or rapidly progressive resulting in fatal overwhelming sepsis. Latency with subsequent activation of disease is well recognized, but very(More)
A retrospective study of 191 cases of septic arthritis was undertaken at Royal Darwin Hospital in the tropical north of Australia. Incidence was 9.2 per 100,000 overall and 29.1 per 100,000 in Aboriginal Australians (RR 6.6; 95% CI 5.0-8.9). Males were affected more than females (RR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2-2.1). There was no previous joint disease or medical(More)
In a 12-year prospective study of 318 culture-confirmed cases of melioidosis from the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia, rainfall data for individual patient locations were correlated with patient risk factors, clinical parameters, and outcomes. Median rainfall in the 14 days before admission was highest (211 mm) for those dying with(More)
BACKGROUND Regional differences in the prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and PVL isoform-harboring strains as well as in the local population structure of Staphylococcus aureus may influence the clinical spectrum of S. aureus infections. METHODS Using a prospective collection of S. aureus isolates from northern Australia, we determined(More)