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SUMMARY In 1995 the American College of Sports Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published national guidelines on Physical Activity and Public Health. The Committee on Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation of the American Heart Association endorsed and supported these recommendations. The purpose of the present report is to update(More)
The purpose of this Position Stand is to provide guidance to professionals who counsel and prescribe individualized exercise to apparently healthy adults of all ages. These recommendations also may apply to adults with certain chronic diseases or disabilities, when appropriately evaluated and advised by a health professional. This document supersedes the(More)
Air pollution is a heterogeneous, complex mixture of gases, liquids, and particulate matter. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a consistent increased risk for cardiovascular events in relation to both short- and long-term exposure to present-day concentrations of ambient particulate matter. Several plausible mechanistic pathways have been described,(More)
Improving diet and lifestyle is a critical component of the American Heart Association's strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in the general population. This document presents recommendations designed to meet this objective. Specific goals are to consume an overall healthy diet; aim for a healthy body weight; aim for recommended levels of(More)
Hypertension (HTN), one of the most common medical disorders, is associated with an increased incidence of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Lifestyle modifications are advocated for the prevention, treatment, and control of HTN, with exercise being an integral component. Exercise programs that primarily involve endurance activities(More)
WRITING COMMITTEE MEMBERS* Patrick T. O’Gara, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair†; Frederick G. Kushner, MD, FACC, FAHA, FSCAI, Vice Chair*†; Deborah D. Ascheim, MD, FACC†; Donald E. Casey, Jr, MD, MPH, MBA, FACP, FAHA‡; Mina K. Chung, MD, FACC, FAHA*†; James A. de Lemos, MD, FACC†; Steven M. Ettinger, MD, FACC*§; James C. Fang, MD, FACC, FAHA†; Francis M. Fesmire, MD,(More)
In order to stimulate further adaptation toward a specific training goal(s), progression in the type of resistance training protocol used is necessary. The optimal characteristics of strength-specific programs include the use of both concentric and eccentric muscle actions and the performance of both single- and multiple-joint exercises. It is also(More)
R egular physical activity using large muscle groups, such as walking, running, or swimming, produces cardiovas-cular adaptations that increase exercise capacity, endurance, and skeletal muscle strength. Habitual physical activity also prevents the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and reduces symptoms in patients with established cardiovas-cular(More)