Barbara Golia

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ADP-ribosylation is a reversible post-translational modification with wide-ranging biological functions in all kingdoms of life. A variety of enzymes use NAD+ to transfer either single or multiple ADP-ribose (ADPr) moieties onto distinct amino acid substrates, often in response to DNA damage or other stresses. Poly-ADPr-glycohydrolase readily reverses(More)
Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. A family of proteins that catalyse ADP-ribosylation reactions are the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs covalently attach an ADP-ribose nucleotide to target proteins and some PARP family members(More)
ADP-ribosylation is a dynamic post-translation modification that regulates the early phase of various DNA repair pathways by recruiting repair factors to chromatin. ADP-ribosylation levels are defined by the activities of specific transferases and hydrolases. However, except for the transferase PARP1/ARDT1 little is known about regulation of these enzymes.(More)
Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification generated in high amounts by poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) in response to cellular stress, especially genotoxic stimuli. DNA damage-induced PARylation significantly changes local chromatin structure and triggers the accumulation of several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins at the DNA lesions.(More)
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