Bang-lin Luo

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We have analyzed mid-infrared limb-emission measurements of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) during the Antarctic winter 2003 with respect to PSC composition. Coincident Lidar observations from Mc-Murdo were used for comparison with PSC types 1a, 1b and 2. Application of new(More)
Subvisible cirrus clouds (SVCs) may contribute to dehydration close to the tropical tropopause. The higher and colder SVCs and the larger their ice crystals, the more likely they represent the last efficient point of contact of the gas phase with the ice phase and, hence, the last dehydrating step, before the air enters the stratosphere. The first(More)
Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a key role in polar ozone depletion. In the Arc-tic, PSCs can occur on the mesoscale due to orographically induced gravity waves. Here we present a detailed study of a mountain wave PSC event on 25–27 January 2000 over Scandinavia. The mountain wave PSCs were intensively observed by in-situ 5 and remote-sensing(More)
A PSC was detected on 6 February 2003 in the Arctic stratosphere by in-situ measurements onboard the high-altitude research aircraft Geophysica. Low number densities (∼10 −4 cm −3) of small nitric acid (HNO 3) containing particles (d<6 µm) were observed at altitudes between 18 and 20 km. Provided the temperatures remain below the NAT equilibrium temperature(More)
Heterogeneous ice freezing points of aqueous solutions containing various immersed solid dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, adipic, succinic, phthalic and fumaric) have been measured with a differential scanning calorimeter. The results show that only the dihydrate of oxalic acid (OAD) acts as a heterogeneous ice nucleus, with an increase in freezing temperature(More)
Space borne infrared limb emission measurements by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) reveal the formation of a belt of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles over Antarctica in mid-June 2003. By mesoscale microphysical simulations we show that this sudden onset of NAT PSCs was caused(More)
A polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) was observed on 6 February 2003 in the Arctic stratosphere by in-situ measurements onboard the high-altitude research aircraft Geo-physica. Low number densities (∼10 −4 cm −3) of nitric acid (HNO 3) containing particles – probably NAT – with diameters up to 6 µm were measured at altitudes between 5 18 and 20 km. These(More)
Although it is well known that air enters the stratosphere preferentially through upwelling in the tropics, the exact mechanisms of troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST) are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms have been found either to be too slow (e.g., clear sky up-welling) to provide agreement with in situ tracer measurements , or to be(More)