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Surface properties, including topography and chemistry, are of prime importance in establishing the response of tissues to biomaterials. Microfabrication techniques have enabled the production of precisely controlled surface topographies that have been used as substrata for cells in culture and on devices implanted in vivo. This article reviews aspects of(More)
A desirable feature of an implant surface which penetrates epithelium would be that the surface impedes epithelial downgrowth. Previous experiments have shown that the micromachined, horizontally oriented grooves on the percutaneous implant surface can impede epithelial downgrowth (Chehroudi et al., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 22, 459 (1988) and 23, 1067(More)
Ideally, the surface of epithelium-penetrating implants should impede apical epithelial migration. Previous studies have shown that micromachined grooved surfaces can produce connective-tissue ingrowth, which inhibits epithelial downgrowth on percutaneous implants [Chehroudi et al., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 24, 9, (1990)]. However, in those studies,(More)
Previous studies using light microscopy have demonstrated that micromachined grooved surfaces inhibit epithelial (E) downgrowth and affect cell orientation at the tissue/implant interface. This study investigates the ultrastructure of the epithelial and connective-tissue attachment to titanium-coated micromachined grooved, as well as smooth control, implant(More)
The effects of grooved epoxy substrata on epithelial (E) cell behavior were studied in vitro and in vivo. V-shaped grooves, 10 microns deep, were produced in silicon wafers by micromachining, a process which was developed for the fabrication of microelectronic components. The grooved substrata were replicated in epoxy resin. More E cells attached to grooved(More)
Surface topography varies widely among commercially available orthopedic and dental implants. While it is generally accepted that the surface topography of an implant influences the formation of bone and affects its performance, few systematic studies have dealt with this important feature. Quantification of the mineralized tissue at the implant interface(More)
The effects of a grooved titanium-coated substratum on epithelial (E) cell behavior were studied in vitro and in vivo. V-shaped grooves, 10 microns deep, were produced in silicon wafers by micromachining, a process which was developed for the fabrication of microelectronic components. The grooved substrata were replicated in epoxy resin and coated with 50(More)
A two-stage replica technique with a subsequent titanium (Ti)-coating treatment was used to faithfully replicate topographies of polished, acid-etched, machined-like, finely blasted, coarsely blasted, coarsely blasted and acid-etched, and Ti plasma-sprayed Ti surfaces. The replicas were used to study the influence of different rough surface topographies on(More)
PURPOSE A major concern for implants that penetrate stratified epithelia is aggressive epithelial proliferation and migration. This epithelial downgrowth on the implant can be inhibited by a firm attachment between the underlying connective tissue and the implant. This study evaluates the connective tissue attachment to titanium implants with various(More)
OBJECTIVE Although currently available implants can be used to achieve osseointegration under well-defined conditions, a greater understanding of cell behaviour is required to improve the designs and embark on actual tissue engineering. MATERIALS AND METHODS We employed micromachined substrata to investigate some of the main behavioural responses of(More)