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Wear facets and enamel spalling in tyrannosaurid dinosaurs
Numerous paleontologists have noted wear facets on tyrannosaurid lateral teeth over the past century. While several workers have proposed explanations for these features, there remains to this day no
Extinction implications of a chenopod browse diet for a giant Pleistocene kangaroo
TLDR
Craniodental morphology, stable-isotopic, and dental microwear data are combined to reveal that the largest-ever kangaroo, Procoptodon goliah, was a chenopod browse specialist, which may have had a preference for Atriplex (saltbushes), one of a few dicots using the C4 photosynthetic pathway.
Helodermatid Lizard from the Mio-Pliocene Oak-Hickory Forest of Tennessee, Eastern USA, and a Review of Monstersaurian Osteoderms
TLDR
Helodermatid osteoderms from the late Miocene-early Pliocene Gray Fossil Site, eastern Tennessee USA indicate an oak-hickory subtropical forest dominated by Quercus and Carya with some conifer species, an understorey including the climbing vines Sinomenium, Sargentodoxa, and Vitis and plant and mammal remains indicate a strong Asian influence.
Was the Giant Short-Faced Bear a Hyper-Scavenger? A New Approach to the Dietary Study of Ursids Using Dental Microwear Textures
TLDR
Compatibility of dental microwear textures of first and second lower molars with diet in extant ursids is assessed to evaluate the hypothesis that the Pleistocene giant short-faced bear, Arctodus simus, was a bone consumer and hyper-scavenger at Rancho La Brea, California, USA.
Carnassial microwear and dietary behaviour in large carnivorans
TLDR
The application of microwear analyses to carnivores can be used to interpret competition and niche position within a guild of fossil carnivores across space and through time.
Implications of Diet for the Extinction of Saber-Toothed Cats and American Lions
TLDR
Dental Microwear Texture Analysis characters most indicative of bone consumption suggest that carcass utilization by the extinct carnivorans was not necessarily more complete during the Pleistocene at La Brea; thus, times may not have been “tougher” than the present.
Direct Comparisons of 2D and 3D Dental Microwear Proxies in Extant Herbivorous and Carnivorous Mammals
TLDR
Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA), which analyzes microwear features in three dimensions, alleviates some of the problems surrounding two-dimensional microwear methods by reducing observer bias, and demonstrates significant interobserver differences in 2D microwear data.
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