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The Function of Haemoglobin in Chironomus Plumosus Under Natural Conditions
1. The behaviour of final-instar larvae of Chironomus plumosus housed in U-shaped glass tubes was observed at various concentrations of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide. 2. Respiratory behaviour,Expand
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The Oxygen Requirements and Thermal Resistance of Chironomid Larvae from Flowing And From Still Waters
1. The larvae of two chironomid species, Tanytarsus brunnipes and Anatopynia nebulosa , living in streams consume more oxygen than the closely related Chironomus longistylus and Anatopynia varia fromExpand
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Feeding mechanisms of Chironomus larvae.
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The function of haemoglobin in relation to filter feeding in leaf-mining chironomid larvae.
  • B. M. Walshe
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
  • 1 March 1951
1. The filter feeding of four species of leaf-mining chironomid larvae with and without functional haemoglobin was studied at different oxygen concentrations. 2. Two red species, GlyptotendipesExpand
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The function of haemoglobin in Tanytarsus (Chironomidae).
  • B. M. Walshe
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
  • 1 December 1947
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The feeding habits of certain chironomid larvae (subfamily Tendipedinae).
SUMMARY 1The nature of the food and the feeding mechanisms of various chironomid larvae with different modes of life have been studied by observing their feeding behaviour in the laboratory andExpand
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On the function of haemoglobin in Chironomus after oxygen lack.
  • B. M. Walshe
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
  • 1 December 1947
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Klino-kinesis of Paramecium
IT has been shown by Ullyott1 that the aggregation reaction of the flatworm, Dendroccelum lacteum, in a gradient of light intensities, can be described in terms of the rate of change of direction andExpand
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Feeding Mechanisms of Chironomus Larvæ
THE large, haemoglobin-bearing larvae of the genus Chironomus, commonly known as bloodworms, are the most abundant and widespread members of the bottom mud communities in ponds and lakes, but owingExpand
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