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Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi
TLDR
The results indicate that the prevailing paradigm of white rot vs. brown rot does not capture the diversity of fungal wood decay mechanisms, and suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white-rot and brown-rot modes of wood decay.
Fungal Planet description sheets: 400–468
TLDR
Novel species of fungi described in the present study include the following from Australia: Vermiculariopsiella eucalypti, Mulderomyces natalis, Fusicladium paraamoenum, Neotrimmatostroma paraexcentricum, and Pseudophloeospora eUCalyptorum.
Fungal Planet description sheets: 371–399
TLDR
Several novelties are introduced from Spain, namely Psathyrella complutensis on loamy soil, Chlorophyllum lusitanicum on nitrified grasslands and Pseudobeltrania ocoteae from Ocotea obtusata (Beltraniaceae emend.).
An Antarctic Hot Spot for Fungi at Shackleton's Historic Hut on Cape Royds
TLDR
Fungi causing decay in the historic wooden structures and artifacts are of great concern, and this investigation provides insight into the identity and species diversity of fungi found at the site.
Elucidating "lucidum": Distinguishing the diverse laccate Ganoderma species of the United States
TLDR
This study clarifies the chaotic taxonomy of the laccate Ganoderma in the United States, and will help to remove ambiguities from future studies focusing on the North American species of laccates.
Endoglucanase-producing fungi isolated from Cape Evans historic expedition hut on Ross Island, Antarctica.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that cellulolytic filamentous fungi found in Antarctica are capable of growth at cold temperatures and possess the ability to produce extracellular endo-1, 4-beta-glucanase when cultured at cold and temperate temperatures.
Wood-Destroying Soft Rot Fungi in the Historic Expedition Huts of Antarctica
TLDR
The presence of Cadophora species, but only limited decay, suggests there is no immediate threat to the structural integrity of the huts, however, these fungi are widely found in wood from the historic huts and have the capacity to cause extensive soft rot if conditions that are more conducive to decay become common.
Fungal colonization of exotic substrates in Antarctica
TLDR
Fungal abundance on soil adhering to substrates was found to be similar to that found in non-polar soils indicating that lack of organic material may be the most significant limiting factor affecting densities of Antarctic fungal populations.
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