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Cassini Encounters Enceladus: Background and the Discovery of a South Polar Hot Spot
TLDR
Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) detected 3 to 7 gigawatts of thermal emission from the south polar troughs at temperatures up to 145 kelvin or higher, making Enceladus only the third known solid planetary body—after Earth and Io—that is sufficiently geologically active for its internal heat to be detected by remote sensing. Expand
Character and Spatial Distribution of OH/H2O on the Surface of the Moon Seen by M3 on Chandrayaan-1
TLDR
Analysis of recent infrared mapping by Chandrayaan-1 and Deep Impact, and reexamining Cassini data obtained during its early flyby of the Moon, Pieters et al. reveal a noticeable absorption signal for H2O and OH across much of the surface, implying that solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic. Expand
The Pluto system: Initial results from its exploration by New Horizons
TLDR
The New Horizons encounter revealed that Pluto displays a surprisingly wide variety of geological landforms, including those resulting from glaciological and surface-atmosphere interactions as well as impact, tectonic, possible cryovolcanic, and mass-wasting processes. Expand
The Cassini Visual And Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (Vims) Investigation
The Cassini visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) investigation is a multidisciplinary study of the Saturnian system. Visual and near-infrared imaging spectroscopy and high-speedExpand
Observations of Comet 19P/Borrelly by the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer Aboard Deep Space 1
TLDR
The nucleus of the Jupiter-family comet 19P/Borrelly was closely observed by the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer aboard the Deep Space 1 spacecraft on 22 September 2001, and Borrelly's coma exhibits two types of dust features: fans and highly collimated jets. Expand
Deep Space 1 photometry of the nucleus of Comet 19P/Borrelly
Abstract The NASA-JPL Deep Space 1 Mission (DS1) encountered the short-period Jupiter-family Comet 19P/Borrelly on September 22, 2001, about 8 days after perihelion. DS1's payload contained aExpand
Surface compositions across Pluto and Charon
TLDR
The New Horizons team presents the complex surface features and geology of Pluto and its large moon Charon, including evidence of tectonics, glacial flow, and possible cryovolcanoes, as well as their analysis of the encounter data downloaded so far. Expand
An observed correlation between plume activity and tidal stresses on Enceladus
TLDR
It is reported that the plume’s horizontally integrated brightness is several times greater when Enceladus is near the point in its eccentric orbit where it is furthest from Saturn than it is when close to the point of closest approach to the planet. Expand
Voyager photometry of Europa
Abstract Ninety voyager images ranging in phase angle from 3 to 143° and covering the spectral range from 0.34 to 0.58 μm were analyzed to derive the photometric properties of Europa. At small phaseExpand
The small satellites of Pluto as observed by New Horizons
TLDR
The New Horizons results on Pluto’s small moons help to elucidate the conditions under which the Pluto system formed and evolved, and massively increase the understanding of the bodies in the outer solar system. Expand
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