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Diptera as parasitoids.
TLDR
This review focuses on several aspects of the bionomics of dipteran parasitoids that have received little comprehensive treatment, including processes associated with host location and attack, patterns of host use, and the evolutionary and ecological consequences of host-parasitoid interactions. Expand
GENERIC REVISION OF PHORIDAE OF THE NEARCTIC REGION AND PHYLOGENETIC CLASSIFICATION OF PHORIDAE, SCIADOCERIDAE, AND IRONOMYIIDAE (DIPTERA: PHORIDEA)
TLDR
The Nearctic Region genera of Phoridae are revised, and it is shown that the current classification into three subfamilies is inadequate, and species-level revisions of genera are needed before further progress can be made in this family. Expand
Reduced foraging of Solenopsis geminata (Hymenoptera : Formicidae) in the presence of parasitic Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera : Phoridae)
TLDR
It is argued that phorid parasitoids are excellent candidates for biological control of imported fire ants because virtually all workers assume a distinctive antiparasitoid defense posture. Expand
A New Threat to Honey Bees, the Parasitic Phorid Fly Apocephalus borealis
TLDR
The first documentation is provided that the phorid fly Apocephalus borealis, previously known to parasitize bumble bees, also infects and eventually kills honey bees and may pose an emerging threat to North American apiculture. Expand
Malaise Trap Catches and the Crisis in Neotropical Dipterology
Diptera, or true flies, are extremely diverse but poorly known, especially in the Neotropical Region. Malaise trap catches from four sites are analyzed and found to contain mostly Diptera, withExpand
Taxonomic revision of Neodohrniphora, subgenus Eibesfeldtphora (Diptera: Phoridae)
The genus Neodohrniphora, subgenus Eibesfeldtphora, is revised and found to include 15 species, 11 of which are new to science, as follows: N. arcuata, bragancai, dissita, elongata, erthali, inferna,Expand
Pollination of Aristolochia littoralis (Aristolochiales: Aristolochiaceae) by Males of Megaselia spp. (Diptera: Phoridae)
TLDR
Experimental evidence suggests that flies are attracted to flowers by an olfactory cue, although visual cues might be used at short range, while at least some specimens of each Megaselia species carried clumps of pollen, suggesting that they were of an appropriate size to carry out pollination. Expand
Comprehensive inventory of true flies (Diptera) at a tropical site
TLDR
The intensive inventory of a four-hectare tropical cloud forest in Costa Rica for one year yielded 4332 species of Diptera, providing the first verifiable basis for diversity of a major group of insects at a single site in the tropics. Expand
Remarkable fly (Diptera) diversity in a patch of Costa Rican cloud forest: Why inventory is a vital science.
TLDR
The number of species of Diptera in tropical regions has been severely underestimated and the actual number may surpass the number ofspecies of Coleoptera. Expand
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