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The genome of a motile marine Synechococcus
TLDR
The genome of WH8102 seems to have been greatly influenced by horizontal gene transfer, partially through phages, and is more of a generalist than two related marine cyanobacteria.
A genetic manipulation system for oceanic cyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus
  • B. Brahamsha
  • Biology
    Applied and environmental microbiology
  • 1 May 1996
TLDR
A number of molecular tools for the genetic manipulation of Synechococcus sp.
An abundant cell-surface polypeptide is required for swimming by the nonflagellated marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus.
  • B. Brahamsha
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…
  • 25 June 1996
TLDR
An abundant cell-surface-associated polypeptide that is required for swimming motility by Synechococcus sp.
Biochemical and cytological analysis of the complex periplasmic flagella from Spirochaeta aurantia
The periplasmic flagella of Spirochaeta aurantia were isolated and were found to be ultrastructurally and biochemically complex. Generally, flagellar filaments were 18 to 20 nm in diameter and
Identification of multiple RNA polymerase sigma factor homologs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120: cloning, expression, and inactivation of the sigB and sigC genes
TLDR
Insertional inactivation of sigB and sigC indicates that neither gene alone is essential for nitrogen fixation or heterocyst differentiation.
The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH7805 requires urease (urea amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.5) to utilize urea as a nitrogen source: molecular-genetic and biochemical analysis of the enzyme.
TLDR
Inactivation of the large subunit of urease, ureC, prevented WH7805 and Synechococcus WH8102 from growing on urea, demonstrating that the ure enzyme genes cloned are essential to the ability of these cyanobacteria to utilize urea as a nitrogen source.
Swimming Marine Synechococcus Strains with Widely Different Photosynthetic Pigment Ratios Form a Monophyletic Group
TLDR
The genetic diversity (as determined by the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase rpoC1 gene sequence) of a set of marine Synechococcus isolates that are able to swim are studied and show that these isolates form a monophyletic group.
Structure of Compositionally Simple Lipopolysaccharide from Marine Synechococcus
TLDR
The highly simplified nature of LPSs from cyanobacteria based on two strains of marine Synechococcus leads us to believe that they may represent either a primordial structure or an adaptation to the relatively higher salt and potentially growth-limiting phosphate levels in marine environments.
Microarray analysis of phosphate regulation in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH8102
TLDR
A high degree of overlap in the sets of genes affected by P stress conditions and in the knockout mutants supports this hypothesis; however, there is some indication that other regulators may be involved in this response in Synechococcus sp.
Inactivation of swmA Results in the Loss of an Outer Cell Layer in a Swimming Synechococcus Strain
TLDR
Ulastructural comparisons of wild-type cells to a mutant strain in which the gene encoding SwmA has been insertionally inactivated reveal that the mutant lacks a layer external to the outer membrane.
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