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This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11663 deg 2 of imaging data, with most of the ∼ 2000 deg 2 increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog(More)
This paper describes the Sixth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With this data release, the imaging of the northern Galactic cap is now complete. The survey contains images and parameters of roughly 287 million objects over 9583 deg 2 , including scans over a large range of Galactic latitudes and longitudes. The survey also includes 1.27(More)
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u g r i z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging(More)
Major advances in our understanding of the Universe have historically come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. The as-trometric observations obtained by modern digital sky surveys are enabling unprecedentedly massive and robust studies of the kinematics of the Milky Way. For example, the astrometric data(More)
In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is producing a massive spectroscopic database which already contains over 280,000 stellar spectra. Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for ∼60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2 < g − r < 0.6), we develop polynomial(More)
Using SDSS Data Release 6, we construct two independent samples of candidate stellar wide binaries selected as i) pairs of unresolved sources with angular separation in the range 3 ′′ − 16 ′′ , ii) common proper motion pairs with 5 ′′ − 30 ′′ angular separation, and make them publicly available. These samples are dominated by disk stars, and we use them to(More)
PSR J2129−0429 is a " redback " eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hr orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean m R =16.6 mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric data set available for(More)
Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with velocities so high that they exceed the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Several acceleration mechanisms have been discussed. Only one HVS (US 708, HVS 2) is a compact helium star. Here we present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of US 708. Traveling with a velocity of ~1200 kilometers per second, it is the fastest(More)
Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20, 000 deg 2 footprint. While the(More)