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Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical drug therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of DILI is little known. It is difficult to predict DILI in humans due to the lack of experimental animal models. Diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug rarely causes severe liver injury in human, but there(More)
Among the homeotic mutants with altered floral organs, two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, apetala3 and pistillata, and two mutants of Antirrhinum majus, deficiens and globosa, have a homeotic conversion of the floral organs in whorl 2 and 3, namely petals to sepals and stamens to carpels. We have isolated a homologue of the DEFICIENS gene from A. thaliana(More)
Drug-induced liver injury is a growing concern for pharmaceutical companies and patients because numerous drugs have been linked to hepatotoxicity and it is the most common reason for a drug to be withdrawn. Flutamide rarely causes liver dysfunction in humans, and immune allergic reactions have been suggested in some cases. In this study, we investigated(More)
MicroRNAs (miRNA) form a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression. Most cellular pathways are modulated by miRNAs. However, the pathophysiological role of miRNAs during drug-induced liver injury (DILI) remains largely unknown. In this study, the possible involvement of miRNAs in DILI caused by the hepatotoxic drug(More)
Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed in nine species belonging to subgenus Ceratotropis (genus Vigna, Papilionaceae), including cultivated, weedy and wild races of azuki bean (V. angularis), and five outgroup species by sequences in the trnL intron and trnL-F intergenic spacer of cpDNA, in order to perform molecular identification of archaeological(More)
Drug-induced liver injury is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical pharmacotherapy; however, advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury are hampered by the lack of animal models. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a widely used antiepileptic agent. Although the drug is generally well tolerated, only a small number of(More)
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical pharmacotherapy. However, prediction of DILI is difficult because the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To establish a novel cell-based screening system to suggest drugs with hepatotoxic potential in preclinical drug development, comprehensive gene(More)
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical drug therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of DILI is little known. It is generally believed that women exhibit worse outcomes from DILI than men. Recently, we found that pretreatment of mice with estradiol attenuated halothane (HAL)-induced liver injury,(More)
Carbamazepine (CBZ) is widely used as an antiepileptic agent and causes rare but severe liver injury in humans. It has been generally recognized that reactive metabolites formed via the metabolic activation reaction contribute to the onset of liver injuries by several drugs. However, the role of CBZ metabolism in the development of liver injury is not fully(More)
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a serious problem in pre-clinical stages of drug development and clinical pharmacotherapy, but the pathogenesis of DILI has not been elucidated. Flucloxacillin (FLX), which is a β-lactam antibiotic of the penicillin class that is used widely in Europe and Australia, rarely causes DILI. Clinical features suggest that(More)