Aurélia Defour

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Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth that associates with raptor and rictor to form the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, respectively. Raptor is required for oxidative muscle integrity, whereas rictor is dispensable. In this study, we show that muscle-specific inactivation of mTOR leads to severe myopathy, resulting in(More)
In muscle and other mechanically active tissue, cell membranes are constantly injured, and their repair depends on the injury-induced increase in cytosolic calcium. Here, we show that injury-triggered Ca(2+) increase results in assembly of ESCRT III and accessory proteins at the site of repair. This process is initiated by the calcium-binding(More)
BACKGROUND Mitochondria can sense signals linked to variations in energy demand to regulate nuclear gene expression. This retrograde signaling pathway is presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells are characterized by their failure to both irreversibly exit the cell cycle and complete(More)
Dysferlin deficiency compromises the repair of injured muscle, but the underlying cellular mechanism remains elusive. To study this phenomenon, we have developed mouse and human myoblast models for dysferlinopathy. These dysferlinopathic myoblasts undergo normal differentiation but have a deficit in their ability to repair focal injury to their cell(More)
Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, has emerged as a main determinant of whole body homeostasis in mammals by regulating a large spectrum of transcriptional regulators in metabolically relevant tissue such as liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c is a transcription factor that(More)
Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo,(More)
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