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Dysferlin deficiency compromises the repair of injured muscle, but the underlying cellular mechanism remains elusive. To study this phenomenon, we have developed mouse and human myoblast models for dysferlinopathy. These dysferlinopathic myoblasts undergo normal differentiation but have a deficit in their ability to repair focal injury to their cell(More)
Although it is well established that chronic hypoxia leads to an inexorable loss of skeletal muscle mass in healthy subjects, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in this process are currently unknown. Skeletal muscle atrophy is also an important systemic consequence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the role of hypoxemia in this(More)
In muscle and other mechanically active tissue, cell membranes are constantly injured, and their repair depends on the injury-induced increase in cytosolic calcium. Here, we show that injury-triggered Ca(2+) increase results in assembly of ESCRT III and accessory proteins at the site of repair. This process is initiated by the calcium-binding(More)
Skeletal muscles are proficient at healing from a variety of injuries. Healing occurs in two phases, early and late phase. Early phase involves healing the injured sarcolemma and restricting the spread of damage to the injured myofiber. Late phase of healing occurs a few days postinjury and involves interaction of injured myofibers with regenerative and(More)
The ability of injured cells to heal is a fundamental cellular process, but cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in healing injured cells are poorly understood. Here assays are described to monitor the ability and kinetics of healing of cultured cells following localized injury. The first protocol describes an end point based approach to(More)
Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth that associates with raptor and rictor to form the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, respectively. Raptor is required for oxidative muscle integrity, whereas rictor is dispensable. In this study, we show that muscle-specific inactivation of mTOR leads to severe myopathy, resulting in(More)
In skeletal muscle, autophagy is activated in multiple physiological and pathological conditions, notably through the transcriptional regulation of autophagy-related genes by FoxO3. However, recent evidence suggests that autophagy could also be regulated by post-transcriptional mechanisms. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the temporal(More)
Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, has emerged as a main determinant of whole body homeostasis in mammals by regulating a large spectrum of transcriptional regulators in metabolically relevant tissue such as liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c is a transcription factor that(More)
BACKGROUND Mitochondria can sense signals linked to variations in energy demand to regulate nuclear gene expression. This retrograde signaling pathway is presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells are characterized by their failure to both irreversibly exit the cell cycle and complete(More)
Repair of skeletal muscle after sarcolemmal damage involves dysferlin and dysferlin-interacting proteins such as annexins. Mice and patient lacking dysferlin exhibit chronic muscle inflammation and adipogenic replacement of the myofibers. Here, we show that similar to dysferlin, lack of annexin A2 (AnxA2) also results in poor myofiber repair and progressive(More)