Atul Narkhede

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BACKGROUND We previously demonstrated that parietal lobe white matter hyperintensities (WMH) increase the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we examined whether individuals with apolipoprotein E gene (APOE ε4) have increased parietal WMH volume. METHODS Participants were from the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP; n = 694, 47(More)
OBJECTIVE Physical fitness is an important correlate of structural and functional integrity of the brain in healthy adults. In heart failure (HF) patients, poor physical fitness may contribute to cognitive dysfunction and we examined the unique contribution of physical fitness to brain structural integrity among patients with HF. METHODS Sixty-nine HF(More)
IMPORTANCE Current hypothetical models emphasize the importance of β-amyloid in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis, although amyloid alone is not sufficient to account for the dementia syndrome. The impact of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease, visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging scans, may be a key factor(More)
Accumulating evidence implicates small vessel cerebrovascular disease, visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cross-sectional volumetric measures of WMH, particularly in the parietal lobes, are associated with increased risk of AD. In the(More)
Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF) and believed to be the result of cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent brain changes including white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). The current study examined the association between cerebral blood flow and WMHs in patients with HF and the relationship between WMHs and cognitive impairment. Sixty-nine(More)
Emerging studies link vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular health to the prevalence and rates of progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The brain's ability to maintain constant blood flow across a range of cerebral perfusion pressures, or autoregulation, may both promote and result from small vessel cerebrovascular disease and AD-related amyloid(More)
Cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) is believed to in part stem from structural brain alterations, including shrinkage of subcortical regions. Fortunately, neurocognitive dysfunction in HF can be mitigated by physical activity (PA), though mechanisms for this phenomenon are unclear. PA is protective against age-related cognitive decline that may(More)
BACKGROUND Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides key biomarkers to predict onset and track progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, most published reports of relationships between MRI variables and cognition in older adults include racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically homogenous samples. Racial/ethnic differences in MRI(More)
OBJECTIVE White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are areas of increased signal on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that most commonly reflect small vessel cerebrovascular disease. Increased WMH volume is associated with risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These observations are typically interpreted as evidence that vascular(More)
BACKGROUND Heart failure patients require assistance with instrumental activities of daily living in part because of the high rates of cognitive impairment in this population. Structural brain insult (eg, reduced gray matter volume) is theorized to underlie cognitive dysfunction in heart failure, although no study has examined the association among gray(More)