Asya Pereltsvaig

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This is an introduction to a special volume of Nordlyd available at http://www.ub.uit.no/munin/nordlyd/. It outlines those aspects of Slavic verbal morphology which are of relevance to the papers in the volume, explaining various background assumptions, analytic motivations, and glossing conventions along the way, with reference to the papers in the volume.(More)
0. Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 1. Babby on “Declarative” and “Existential” sentences ...................................................................................... 6 1.1. The scope of negation. Theme and Rheme.(More)
In his recent article (Shlonsky, U., 2004. The form of Semitic noun phrases. Lingua 114, 1465–1526), Shlonsky proposes a phrasal-movement analysis of word order in Hebrew (and Arabic) noun phrases and argues that the positioning of nominal modifiers with respect to the head-noun cannot be adequately handled by an N-raising derivation. In the present article(More)
In other words, Russian -nibud’ indefinites can be considered dependent indefinites, or markers of co-variation: they must introduce a dependent variable, that is a variable the values assigned to which co-vary with those assigned to another variable, the so-called “domain variable” (cf. Farkas’ 1997, 2002). In this way, Russian -nibud’ indefinites resemble(More)
The two goals of this paper are (i) to establish that there are comparative correlatives that are not comparative conditionals and that the semantics of such correlatives crucially involves a relation (possibly the identity relation) between differentials (against much of the previous literature, e.g., McCawley 1988, Beck 1997) and (ii) to argue that a(More)
Since the adoption of Abney’s (1987) influential proposal that noun phrases are (at most) DPs, the hypothesis that not all noun phrases in all languages are DPs has been widely debated. A particularly interesting case in this respect is presented by Slavic languages lacking overt articles such as Russian or Serbo-Croatian: are noun phrases in such languages(More)