Ashley N. Randle

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Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system.(More)
The GM2 gangliosidoses, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) and Sandhoff disease (SD), are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex). Due to the recent emergence of novel experimental treatments, biomarker development has become particularly relevant in GM2 gangliosidosis as an objective means to(More)
BACKGROUND Feline models of neurologic diseases, such as lysosomal storage diseases, leukodystrophies, Parkinson's disease, stroke and NeuroAIDS, accurately recreate many aspects of human disease allowing for comparative study of neuropathology and the testing of novel therapeutics. Here we describe in vivo visualization of fine structures within the feline(More)
Sandhoff disease (SD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the absence of hydrolytic enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), which results in storage of GM2 ganglioside in neurons and unremitting neurodegeneration. Neuron loss initially affects fine motor skills, but rapidly progresses to loss of all body faculties, a vegetative state, and death(More)
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