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Although it can be transformed by various electronic devices, the sound of the solid body electric guitar originates from, and is strongly linked with, the string vibration. The coupling of the string with the guitar alters its vibration and can lead to decay time inhomogeneities. This paper implements and justifies a framework for the study of decay times(More)
Auditory display can complement visual representations in order to better interpret scientific data. A previous article showed that the free categorization of "audified seismic signals" operated by listeners can be explained by various geophysical parameters. The present article confirms this result and shows that cognitive representations of listeners can(More)
Recordings of the Earth's surface oscillation as a function of time (seismograms) can be sonified by compressing time so that most of the signal's frequency spectrum falls in the audible range. The pattern-recognition capabilities of the human auditory system can then be applied to the auditory analysis of seismic data. In this experiment, we sonify a set(More)
A controversial discussion in the musical community regards the ability of the harpsichord to produce sound level or timbre changes. The jack velocity (controlled in real time within a musical context) and the plectrum shape (modified by the musician or maker prior to the performance) appear to be the two control parameters at the disposal of the(More)
Recordings of the Earth's surface oscillation (seismograms) can be sonified such that most of the signal's frequency spectrum falls in the audible range. Then, the pattern-recognition capabilities of the human auditory system can be applied to auditory analysis of seismic data. We sonify seismograms associated with a magnitude 5.6 earthquake. A group of(More)
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