Arnold Munnich

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Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common fatal autosomal recessive disorder characterized by degeneration of lower motor neurons, leading to progressive paralysis with muscular atrophy. The gene for SMA has been mapped to chromosome 5q13, where large-scale deletions have been reported. We describe here the inverted duplication of a 500 kb element in normal(More)
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) represents the main genetic cause of functional intestinal obstruction with an incidence of 1/5000 live births. This developmental disorder is a neurocristopathy and is characterised by the absence of the enteric ganglia along a variable length of the intestine. In the last decades, the development of(More)
This paper describes our present strategy for the investigation of respiratory chain disorders in humans. Because very few of the underlying mutations causing mitochondrial disorders in humans are currently known, biochemical studies constitute a major tool in screening procedures for respiratory chain deficiencies. All biochemical and molecular methods(More)
Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS or Ondine's curse; OMIM 209880) is a life-threatening disorder involving an impaired ventilatory response to hypercarbia and hypoxemia. This core phenotype is associated with lower-penetrance anomalies of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) including Hirschsprung disease and tumors of neural-crest derivatives(More)
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS; MIM 251880) is a prevalent cause of oxidative phosphorylation disorders characterized by a reduction in mtDNA copy number. The hitherto recognized disease mechanisms alter either mtDNA replication (POLG (ref. 1)) or the salvage pathway of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleosides 5′-triphosphates (dNTPs) for mtDNA(More)
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of motor neurons of the spinal cord. Three different forms of childhood SMA have been recognized on the basts of age at onset and clinical course: Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (type l), the intermediate form (type II) and Kugelberg-Welander disease(More)
Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe form of all inherited retinal dystrophies, responsible for congenital blindness. Disease-associated mutations have been hitherto reported in seven genes. These genes are all expressed preferentially in the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium but they are involved in(More)
Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA, MIM 2040001), the earliest and most severe form of inherited retinopathy, accounts for at least 5% of all inherited retinal dystrophies2,3. This autosomal recessive condition is usually recognized at birth or during the first months of life in an infant with total blindness or greatly impaired vision, normal fundus and(More)
Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a common autosomal recessive degenerative disease (1/50,000 live births) characterized by a progressive gait and limb ataxia with lack of tendon reflexes in the legs, dysarthria and pyramidal weakness of the inferior limbs1,2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is observed in most FRDA patients. The gene associated with the disease has(More)
Familial incontinentia pigmenti (IP; MIM 308310) is a genodermatosis that segregates as an X-linked dominant disorder and is usually lethal prenatally in males. In affected females it causes highly variable abnormalities of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, eyes and central nervous system. The prominent skin signs occur in four classic cutaneous stages:(More)