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Invasive Parasites, Habitat Change and Heavy Rainfall Reduce Breeding Success in Darwin's Finches
TLDR
Investigating the influence of the invasive parasitic fly Philornis downsi on the breeding success of two Darwin's finch species, the warbler finch and the sympatric small tree finch, on Santa Cruz Island in 2010 and 2012 found that the control of invasive plant species with herbicides had a significant additive negative impact on thebreeding success. Expand
Identification and Optimization of Microbial Attractants for Philornis downsi, an Invasive Fly Parasitic on Galapagos Birds
TLDR
Results indicate that acetic acid and ethanol produced by yeasts are crucial for P. downsi attraction to fermented materials on which they feed as adults and can be used to manage this invasive fly in Galapagos. Expand
Darwin’s finches treat their feathers with a natural repellent
TLDR
Experimental evidence demonstrates that P. galapageium leaf extracts repel both mosquitoes and adult P. downsi and also inhibit the growth of P.Downsi larvae, suggesting that finches use this plant to repel ectopoarasites. Expand
Population dynamics of an invasive bird parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae), in the Galapagos Islands
TLDR
Investigation of biotic and abiotic factors that may influence the population dynamics of this invasive parasite suggested that populations in both habitats were continuous and multivoltine, and numbers of adult female flies appeared to be regulated chiefly by simple direct density dependence, and may be governed by availability of bird nests with nestlings. Expand
The impact of invasive plant management on the foraging ecology of the Warbler Finch (Certhidea olivacea) and the Small Tree Finch (Camarhynchus parvulus) on Galápagos
TLDR
It was found that both the invasion and the management of R. niveus influenced microhabitat use, foraging substrate and prey choice in both species, and contrary to the hypothesis, a lower attack rate or foraging success was found in the area with recent herbicide application. Expand
Weed management increases the detrimental effect of an invasive parasite on arboreal Darwin's finches
TLDR
A negative additive effect of parasitism and weed management is found on the breeding success of the insectivorous warbler finch, but not on the omnivorous small tree finch (Camarhynchus parvulus), which was strongly affected by parasitism independently of weed management. Expand
Parental care in the Small Tree Finch Camarhynchus parvulus in relation to parasitism and environmental factors
TLDR
Investigation of the interaction of parasitism and weed management, and the influence of climate on feeding rates in a Darwin’s tree finch species, which is negatively impacted by two invasive species finds no evidence that Small Tree Finches can compensate with additional food provisioning when parasitized with P. downsi. Expand
The attitude towards nature and nature conservation on the urban fringes
Nature conservation is often needed to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services for future generations. As conservation measures frequently require financial efforts and imply limitations forExpand
Under adverse conditions, older small tree finch males (Camarhynchus parvulus) produce more offspring than younger males
TLDR
The difference in breeding success disappeared when P. downsi numbers were experimentally reduced by injecting an insecticide into nests, indicating that older males were able to compensate for the detrimental effects of parasitism. Expand
Evidence of hidden hunger in Darwin’s finches as a result of non-native species invasion of the Galapagoes cloud forest
TLDR
It is posited that food web disturbances caused by invasive Rubus niveus (blackberry), but also the management measures used to control it, could contribute to the rapid decline of the insectivourous warbler finch. Expand
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