Arne Sommerfelt

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The main source of data on birth weight in developing countries is statistics from health facilities, although most developing countries do not produce annual estimates of the incidence of low birth weight from these data. Such estimates would be subject to selection bias as the data are usually limited to babies born within health facilities, and therefore(More)
In cross-sectional surveys, the sample of children with anthropometric measurements is not representative of all children in a birth cohort, since only children surviving to the survey date are measured. This survivor bias may have implications for studies of trends and differentials in anthropometric indicators. In this paper, the effects of the survivor(More)
In the context of the Demographic and Health Surveys program (DHS), data were collected on diarrhoeal diseases in childhood and related treatment patterns. In this paper we assess the accuracy and completeness of mothers' recall of diarrhoea in 19 national DHS surveys and discuss the implications for health interview surveys in developing countries. It is(More)
Surveys conducted in the context of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) programme are an important source of data on health of families in developing countries. Both at the national and international level, DHS surveys provide much-needed data on fertility and family planning, on mortality and nutrition, and on health services utilization. The use of(More)
In this study, we use data from the Demographic and Health Surveys to examine the relationship between household structure and childhood immunization in Niger and Nigeria. We show that household structure is an important determinant of childhood immunization in Nigeria: Children from nuclear, elementary polygynous, and three-generational households are(More)
BACKGROUND Durations of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and predominant breastfeeding (PBF) from two different assessments, among the same mother-infant population, were investigated to determine the degree to which the assessments yielded overlapping results. METHODS Thirty Ugandan mother-infant pairs were followed up weekly from birth to three months of(More)
This paper uses data from 22 national surveys in developing countries to estimate the use of bottles for feeding of infants under 6 months of age. These data were collected in the context of the Demographic and Health Surveys programme (DHS) between 1986 and 1989. Bottle use appears to be very common in most countries. Only six of the 22 countries had(More)
Breast milk has a high concentration of secretory immunoglobulin and potentially could serve as a source of passive antibody protection of infants against systemic invasion by Haemophilus influenzae type b. Specific antibody to the capsular polysaccharide of this organism was detected in the colostrum and all subsequent milk samples in 11 of 12 women with a(More)
The main source of data on birth weight in developing countries is statistics from health facilities, although most developing countries do not produce annual estimates of the incidence of low birth weight from these data. Such estimates would be subject to selection bias as the data are usually limited to babies born within health facilities, and therefore(More)
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