Arndt Pechstein

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Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) regulates many cell physiological processes such as the internalization of growth factors and receptors, entry of pathogens, and synaptic transmission. Within the endocytic network, clathrin functions as a central organizing platform for coated pit assembly and dissociation via its terminal domain (TD). We report the(More)
Members of the Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain protein superfamily are involved in membrane remodeling in various cellular pathways ranging from endocytic vesicle and T-tubule formation to cell migration and neuromorphogenesis. Membrane curvature induction and stabilization are encoded within the BAR or Fer-CIP4 homology-BAR (F-BAR) domains, alpha-helical(More)
alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors undergo constitutive and ligand-induced internalization that requires dynamin and the clathrin adaptor complex AP-2. We report here that an atypical basic motif within the cytoplasmic tails of AMPA-type glutamate receptors directly associates with mu2-adaptin by a(More)
Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] is an important factor for a variety of cellular functions ranging from cell signaling to actin cytoskeletal dynamics and endocytic membrane traffic. Here, we have identified the clathrin adaptor complex AP-2 as a regulator of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIPK)-mediated PI(4,5)P(2)(More)
Synapsin I is the most abundant brain phosphoprotein present in conventional synapses of the CNS. Knockout and rescue experiments have demonstrated that synapsin is essential for clustering of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at active zones and the organization of the reserve pool of SVs. However, in spite of intense efforts it remains largely unknown how exactly(More)
Sustained fast neurotransmission requires the rapid replenishment of release-ready synaptic vesicles (SVs) at presynaptic active zones. Although the machineries for exocytic fusion and for subsequent endocytic membrane retrieval have been well characterized, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the rapid recruitment of SVs to release sites. Here(More)
Neurotransmission depends on presynaptic membrane retrieval and local reformation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at nerve terminals. The mechanisms involved in these processes are highly controversial with evidence being presented for SV membranes being retrieved exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) from the plasma membrane or via ultrafast(More)
Sustained neurotransmitter release at synapses during high-frequency synaptic activity involves the mobilization of synaptic vesicles (SVs) from the tightly clustered reserve pool (RP). Synapsin I (Syn I), a brain-specific peripheral membrane protein that undergoes activity-dependent cycles of SV association and dissociation, is implicated in RP(More)
Clathrin-mediated synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling involves the spatiotemporally controlled assembly of clathrin coat components at phosphatidylinositiol (4, 5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)]-enriched membrane sites within the periactive zone. Such spatiotemporal control is needed to coordinate SV cargo sorting with clathrin/AP2 recruitment and to restrain(More)
During neurotransmitter release, SVs (synaptic vesicles) fuse at the active zone and are recovered predominantly via clathrin-mediated endocytosis at the presynaptic compartment surrounding the site of release, referred to as the periactive zone. Exo- and endo-cytosis in synapses are tightly temporarily and spatially coupled to sustain synaptic(More)