Arisa Ueki

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Epimutation is defined as abnormal transcriptional repression of active genes and/or abnormal activation of usually repressed genes caused by errors in epigenetic gene repression. Epimutation arises in somatic cells and the germline, and constitutional epimutation may also occur. Epimutation is the first step of(More)
Osteosarcoma is a high-grade malignant bone tumor that manifests ingravescent clinical behavior. The intrinsic events that confer malignant properties on osteosarcoma cells have remained unclear, however. We previously established two lines of mouse osteosarcoma cells: AX cells, which are able to form tumors in syngeneic mice, and AXT cells, which were(More)
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disease that is characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis and mucocutaneous melanin spots. The tumor suppressor gene, STK11/LKB1, which is located on chromosome 19p13.3, has been reported to be responsible for this condition. PJS is complicated by benign and malignant tumors of various(More)
Endometrial cancer arises from the uterine body and fundus in many cases, but can also originate from the lower region of the uterine body through the upper region of the cervix. Such tumors are referred to as carcinoma of the lower uterine segment (LUS) or isthmus, and account for 3-6.3% of all cases of endometrial cancer. This relatively low incidence has(More)
The Werner (WRN) gene codes for a DNA helicase that contributes to genomic stability and has been identified as the gene responsible for progeria. Recent studies have shown reduced WRN expression due to aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer cells. Furthermore, WRN expression is thought to affect sensitivity (More)
Cases of endometrial cancer have increased in recent years, but the prognosis of patients with this disease has also been improved by combined modality therapy with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the development of new therapy is required from the perspectives of conservation of fertility and efficacy(More)
Lynch syndrome is a genetic disease that often develops in patients with endometrial cancer and is caused by abnormal DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In the United States, it was recently reported that the prevalence of Lynch syndrome with an hMSH2 mutation in patients with endometrial cancer in the lower uterine(More)
Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide. Therefore elucidation of the pathogenesis and development of effective treatment for endometrial cancer are important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic variation and mutations of cancer-related(More)
Some cases of endometrial cancer are associated with a familial tumor and are referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC or Lynch syndrome). Lynch syndrome is thought to be induced by germline mutation of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. An aberration in the MMR gene prevents accurate repair of base mismatches produced during DNA(More)
In budding yeast, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) regulates anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) via the Dbf2-Cdc14 signaling cascade. Dbf2 kinase phosphorylates and activates Cdc14 phosphatase, which removes the inhibitory phosphorylation of the APC/C cofactor Cdh1. Although each component of the MEN was highly conserved during evolution, there is(More)