Anton Miroschnikow

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The muscular attachment sites (MAS) of blowfly larvae can be visualised as “dots” by removing and staining the cuticle. Each segment bears several rows of MAS. The silhouettes of a subset of those rows in the second, third, and fourth segments were previously shown to be specific for four species of L3 blowfly larvae. In this investigation, the MAS patterns(More)
Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and(More)
Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper,(More)
Mapping brain function to brain structure is a fundamental task for neuroscience. For such an endeavour, the Drosophila larva is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to be interesting. It features about 10,000 neurons and is capable of various taxes, kineses and Pavlovian conditioning. All its neurons are currently being mapped into a(More)
NeuromedinU is a potent regulator of food intake and activity in mammals. In Drosophila, neurons producing the homologous neuropeptide hugin regulate feeding and locomotion in a similar manner. Here, we use EM-based reconstruction to generate the entire connectome of hugin-producing neurons in the Drosophila larval CNS. We demonstrate that hugin neurons use(More)
Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitterexpressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and(More)
A novel active ventilatory mechanism of the dorsal air sacs in the abdomen of forager honey bees is described. These air sacs supply the heart with oxygen. During sleep and rest, the air sacs undergo frequent volume changes. The dilation of the air sacs is caused by the activity of hitherto unidentified muscles. Their subsequent collapse is probably due to(More)
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