Anthony Stewart

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A graph H is a square root of a graph G if G can be obtained from H by the addition of edges between any two vertices in H that are of distance 2 from each other. The Square Root problem is that of deciding whether a given graph admits a square root. We consider this problem for planar graphs in the context of the " distance from triviality " framework. For(More)
A graph H is a square root of a graph G if G can be obtained from H by adding an edge between any two vertices in H that are of distance 2. The Square Root problem is that of deciding whether a given graph admits a square root. This problem is only known to be NP-complete for chordal graphs and polynomial-time solvable for non-trivial minor-closed graph(More)
The problem of finding a disconnected cut in a graph is NP-hard in general but polynomial-time solvable on planar graphs. The problem of finding a minimal disconnected cut is also NP-hard but its computational complexity is not known for planar graphs. We show that it is polynomial-time solvable on 3-connected planar graphs but NP-hard for 2-connected(More)
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