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C1 inhibitor deficiency (hereditary angioedema [HAE]) is a rare disorder for which there is a lack of consensus concerning diagnosis, therapy, and management, particularly in Canada. European initiatives have driven the approach to managing HAE with 3 C1-INH Deficiency Workshops held every 2 years in Hungary starting in 1999, with the third Workshop having(More)
Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare but life-threatening condition, manifests as acute attacks of facial, laryngeal, genital, or peripheral swelling or abdominal pain secondary to intra-abdominal edema. Resulting from mutations affecting C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), inhibitor of the first complement system component, attacks are not histamine-mediated(More)
BACKGROUND C1 inhibitor (C1INH) has recently been approved in the USA for the treatment of acute attacks in hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. The literature suggests that treatment with C1INH is most effective when administered early in an attack. Home infusion of C1INH allows for the earliest possible intervention since patients can initiate therapy at(More)
Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent acute attacks of swelling of the larynx, abdomen, and periphery. This study was designed to assess the humanistic burden of illness associated with HAE. HAE burden was assessed via a web-based survey of patients that solicited information on attack(More)
A new form of hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1 inhibitor (C1INH) was first described in 2000. The lack of clear diagnostic criteria, the heterogeneity among affected patients, and the varying names given to this disease have led to substantial confusion among both physicians and patients. This study was designed to bring more clarity to the(More)
Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a chronic disease with a high burden of disease that is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. Availability of treatments, including C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) replacement, ecallantide, and icatibant, marks a significant advance for HAE patients. We aimed to better understand the current state of HAE care, from a patient(More)
Availability of effective treatment for acute attacks is expected to transform the care of hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. We felt that it would be of interest to test these assumptions by examining the perceptions of HAE patients regarding the impact that these therapies have had on their lives. Patients at a United States HAE Association summit(More)
BACKGROUND The consensus documents published to date on hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) have focused on adult patients. Many of the previous recommendations have not been adapted to pediatric patients. We intended to produce consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with C1-INH-HAE. (More)
Hereditary angioedema (HAE) typically presents in childhood. Large gaps remain in our understanding of the natural history of HAE during childhood. We examined age of onset, delay in diagnosis, androgen exposure, and their influence on ultimate disease severity in a large cohort of patients with HAE. Median age of first swelling was 11 years with a median(More)