Ansgar Gruber

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Xylella fastidiosa is a fastidious, xylem-limited bacterium that causes a range of economically important plant diseases. Here we report the complete genome sequence of X. fastidiosa clone 9a5c, which causes citrus variegated chlorosis--a serious disease of orange trees. The genome comprises a 52.7% GC-rich 2,679,305-base-pair (bp) circular chromosome and(More)
Diatoms are photosynthetic secondary endosymbionts found throughout marine and freshwater environments, and are believed to be responsible for around one-fifth of the primary productivity on Earth. The genome sequence of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was recently reported, revealing a wealth of information about diatom biology. Here we(More)
BACKGROUND Diatoms are unicellular algae responsible for approximately 20% of global carbon fixation. Their evolution by secondary endocytobiosis resulted in a complex cellular structure and metabolism compared to algae with primary plastids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS The whole genome sequence of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has recently been(More)
Phototrophic chromalveolates possess plastids surrounded by either 3 or 4 membranes, revealing their secondary endosymbiotic origin from an engulfed eukaryotic alga. In cryptophytes, a member of the chromalveolates, the organelle is embedded within a designated region of the host's rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). Its eukaryotic compartments other than(More)
Plastids of diatoms and related algae evolved by secondary endocytobiosis, the uptake of a eukaryotic alga into a eukaryotic host cell and its subsequent reduction into an organelle. As a result diatom plastids are surrounded by four membranes. Protein targeting of nucleus encoded plastid proteins across these membranes depends on N-terminal bipartite(More)
1 Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany, 2 Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, PO Box 180, D-27483 Helgoland, Germany, 3 Plant Ecophysiology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstr. 10, D-78464 Konstanz, Germany, 4 School of Biological(More)
Cryptophyte and chlorarachniophyte algae are transitional forms in the widespread secondary endosymbiotic acquisition of photosynthesis by engulfment of eukaryotic algae. Unlike most secondary plastid-bearing algae, miniaturized versions of the endosymbiont nuclei (nucleomorphs) persist in cryptophytes and chlorarachniophytes. To determine why, and to(More)
This study reports the development of a novel multiplex PCR assay based on SCAR (Sequence-Characterised Amplified Region) markers for the simultaneous diagnosis of the 7 Eimeria species that infect domestic fowl. Primer pairs specific for each species were designed in order to generate a ladder of amplification products ranging from 200 to 811 bp.(More)
The plastids of ecologically and economically important algae from phyla such as stramenopiles, dinoflagellates and cryptophytes were acquired via a secondary endosymbiosis and are surrounded by three or four membranes. Nuclear-encoded plastid-localized proteins contain N-terminal bipartite targeting peptides with the conserved amino acid sequence motif(More)
Diatoms contribute a large proportion to the worldwide primary production and are particularly effective in fixing carbon dioxide. Possibly because diatom plastids originate from a secondary endocytobiosis, their cellular structure is more complex and metabolic pathways are rearranged within diatom cells compared to cells containing primary plastids. We(More)