Annette L. Medhurst

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Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Nine genes involved in Fanconi anemia have been identified; their products participate in a DNA damage-response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 2,3). We previously purified a Fanconi anemia core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and six(More)
Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility(More)
Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, multiple congenital abnormalities, and an increased risk of cancer. FA cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. At least eight complementation groups exist (FA-A to G), and(More)
ATM and ATR are two related kinases essential for signalling DNA damage. Although ATM is thought to be the principle kinase responsible for signalling ionising radiation (IR)-induced DNA damage, ATR also contributes to signalling this form of genotoxic stress. However, the molecular basis of differential ATM and ATR activation in response to IR remains(More)
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genomic instability disorder, clinically characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to malignancy. Cells derived from patients with FA display a marked sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC). This observation has led to the hypothesis that the proteins(More)
Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder associated with a progressive aplastic anaemia, diverse congenital abnormalities and cancer. The condition is genetically heterogeneous, with at least seven complementation groups (A-G) described. Cells from individuals who are homozygous for mutations in FA genes are characterized by(More)
The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a central role in the DNA damage response network involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2. The complex consists of eight FA proteins, including a ubiquitin ligase (FANCL) and a DNA translocase (FANCM), and is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage. Here,(More)
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. So far 11 complementation groups have been identified, from which only FA-D1/BRCA2 and FA-J are defective downstream of the central FANCD2 protein as cells from these groups are capable of monoubiquitinating(More)
Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by diverse clinical symptoms, hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, chromosomal instability and susceptibility to cancer. Fanconi anemia has at least 11 complementation groups (A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L); the genes mutated in 8 of these have been identified. The gene BRCA2 was(More)
Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a chromosomal instability disorder characterized by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents and a high risk of cancer. Six of the eight proteins encoded by the known FA genes form a nuclear complex which is required for the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein. FANCD2 complexes and colocalizes with BRCA1, but(More)