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We investigated the ability of various melanocortin peptides and corticosterone to influence habituation of prey-catching behavior in the toad, Bufo cognatus. Male toads were injected with various melanocortin peptide fragments or corticosterone 30 min prior to acquisition. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH[1-39]), ACTH[4-10], and N-acetyl ACTH[1-13] amide(More)
PURPOSE Pediatric intracranial aneurysms constitute a medical disease process with many unique features that present unique challenges in orchestrating their treatment. Conflicts exist in pediatric aneurysm literature as to whether endovascular therapy is equivalent to surgical therapy in assuring durable aneurysm obliteration in this population. (More)
An ultrastructural study of eight round-window membranes of four normal cats disclosed three basic layers: an outer epithelium (middle ear), a middle core of connective tissue, and an inner epithelium (inner ear). Morphologic evidence suggests that these layers participate in absorption and secretion of substances to and from the inner ear, such that the(More)
We measured beta-endorphin concentrations in the anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary gland and in microdissected brain regions of moderate-seizure genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-3), severe-seizure GEPR-9s and Sprague-Dawley non-epileptic control rats. Plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and beta-melanocyte-stimulating hormone(More)
We measured the concentrations of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) in various brain regions as well as in the pituitary gland and plasma of the toad Bufo speciosus during a 24-hr light:dark cycle. There was significant diurnal variation of alpha-MSH concentrations in the hypothalamus and brainstem. In both areas alpha-MSH concentrations were(More)
One hundred human and 100 cat temporal bones were studied for the presence of ganglia and/or ganglion cells. These structures were found at the following two main locations: (1) the promontory wall, both anterior to and below the stapes, and (2) the vertical portion of the facial nerve. In the cat, additional ganglion cells were found within the capsule of(More)
Twenty-five temporal bones of cats were studied for the presence of ganglia and/or ganglion cells in the middle ear. These structures were found at the following three main locations: (1) the promontory wall, both anterior to and below the stapes; (2) the capsule of the musculus tensor tympani, proximal, medial, and lateral to muscle fibers; and (3) the(More)
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