Anne J. Sperling

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The volume of the hippocampal formation (HF) in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) varies across the seasons, in parallel with the seasonal cycle in food hoarding. In this study, we estimate cell density and total cell number in the HF across seasons in both juveniles and adults. We find that the seasonal variation in volume is due to an(More)
We evaluated signal-noise discrimination in children with and without dyslexia, using magnocellular and parvocellular visual stimuli presented either with or without high noise. Dyslexic children had elevated contrast thresholds when stimuli of either type were presented in high noise, but performed as well as non-dyslexic children when either type was(More)
We tested the hypothesis that deficits on sensory-processing tasks frequently associated with poor reading and dyslexia are the result of impairments in external-noise exclusion, rather than motion perception or magnocellular processing. We compared the motion-direction discrimination thresholds of adults and children with good or poor reading performance,(More)
We investigated the relationship between reading and explicit and implicit categorical learning by comparing university students with poor reading to students with normal reading abilities on two categorical learning tasks. One categorical learning task involved sorting simple geometric shapes into two groups according to a unidimensional rule. The sorting(More)
A technique by Rogers-Ramachandran and Ramachandran [Vis. Res. 38 (1998) 71-77] was adapted to evaluate magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) visual processing efficiency, with identical task structure, in normal and dyslexic children. A battery of phonological, orthographic and cognitive tasks was administered to assess reading ability and component(More)
The integrity of phonological representation/processing in dyslexic children was explored with a gating task in which children listened to successively longer segments (gates) of a word. At each gate, the task was to decide what the entire word was. Responses were scored for overall accuracy as well as the children's sensitivity to coarticulation from the(More)
Patients with phonologic alexia can be trained to read semantically impoverished words (e.g., functors) by pairing them with phonologically-related semantically rich words (e.g, nouns). What mechanisms underlie success in this cognitive re-training approach? Does the mechanism change if the skill is “overlearned”, i.e., practiced beyond criterion? We(More)
In a previous study [Sperling, A. J., Lu, Z. L., Manis, F. R., & Seidenberg, M. S. (2003). Selective deficits in magnocellular processing: A "phantom contour" study. Neuropsychologia, 41, 1422-1429] we found that dyslexic children were relatively slower in processing achromatic phantom contours. The maximum temporal frequency at which they could identify(More)
BACKGROUND: Phonologic text alexia (PhTA) is a reading disorder in which reading of pseudowords is impaired, but reading of real words is impaired only when reading text. Oral reading accuracy remains well preserved when words are presented individually, but when presented in text the part-of-speech effect that is often seen in phonologic alexia (PhA)(More)
The integrity of phonological representation/processing in dyslexic children was explored with a gating task in which children listened to successively longer segments (gates) of a word. At each gate, the task was to decide what the entire word was. Responses were scored for overall accuracy as well as the children’s sensitivity to coarticulation from the(More)
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