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Parental care improves offspring survival and growth in burying beetles
TLDR
Burying beetles (genus Nicrophorus) provide elaborate parental care to their offspring and the benefits of these behaviours are investigated and tested for possible beneficial effects on larval survival rates and final body mass in N. vespilloides. Expand
Intraspecific brood parasitism in the burying beetle, Necrophorus vespilloides (Coleoptera: Silphidae)
TLDR
A positive correlation between the parasite's duration of stay near the carcass and her chances of parasitizing the other female's brood and a negative effect of parasitism on the caring female's own reproductive success were shown. Expand
Alternative tactics and individual reproductive success in natural associations of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides
TLDR
The notion that Nicrophorus vespilloides uses alternatives conditionally, opportunistically employing lower-benefit tactics when more profitable tactics are not available, or as additional "on-the-side" tactics to bolster reproductive success is supported. Expand
Time-dependent shifts between infanticidal and parental behavior in female burying beetles a mechanism of indirect mother-offspring recognition
TLDR
Female burying beetles Necrophorus vespilloides Herbst (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were allowed to lay eggs on a carcass and their subsequent behavior towards larvae added to the carcass was observed, and most females killed and ate larvae that could not have hatched from their own eggs because they were added long before their own larvae hatched. Expand
Starving the competition: a proximate cause of reproductive skew in burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides)
TLDR
The results of the experiments pertaining to the first two potential mechanisms of reproductive skew in brood-parasitic associations of burying beetles suggest aggressive behaviour by dominants functions in the context of reproductive competition, limiting subordinate reproduction by preventing food intake on the carcass. Expand
Paternity assurance by “helpful” males: adaptations to sperm competition in burying beetles
TLDR
It is shown that male burying beetles are able to achieve a high level of paternity, and the mechanism they employ is a repeat-mating tactic, i.e., the female is mated very frequently shortly before and during oviposition. Expand
The gin trap as a device facilitating coercive mating in sagebrush crickets
TLDR
It is concluded that the gin trap functions as a device by which males with insufficient hind-wing material are able to force copulations upon females unwilling to accept their spermatophores. Expand
FEMALE CONTROL OF SPERM TRANSFER AND INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN SPERM PRECEDENCE: ANTECEDENTS TO THE EVOLUTION OF A COURTSHIP FOOD GIFT
TLDR
Paternity data and morphological evidence accorded best with a model of partial sperm displacement derived here, and how female control of sperm transfer and intraspecific variation in sperm precedence may be important precursors to the evolution of gift giving in insects is discussed. Expand
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