Annabelle Blangero

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Understanding the function of a tool is an essential step in learning to use a tool. This aspect of interaction with tools has hitherto been neglected. Unlike acquiring the expertise in handling a new tool, which involves practice, understanding its function usually only requires a single observation of the tool being used. The present study uncovers the(More)
The rapid point-to-point movements of the eyes called saccades are the most commonly made movement by humans, yet differ from nearly every other type of motor output in that they are completed too quickly to be adjusted during their execution by visual feedback. Saccadic accuracy remains quite high over a lifetime despite inevitable changes to the physical(More)
OBJECTIVE The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is an electroencephalographic response to flickering stimuli generated partly in primary visual area V1. The typical 'cruciform' geometry and retinotopic organization of V1 is such that certain neighboring visual regions project to neighboring cortical regions of opposite orientation. Here, we(More)
In the natural environment, humans make saccades almost continuously. In many eye movement experiments, however, observers are required to fixate for unnaturally long periods of time. The resulting long and monotonous experimental sessions can become especially problematic when collecting data in a clinical setting, where time can be scarce and subjects(More)
39 In the natural environment, humans make saccades almost continuously. In many eye movement 40 experiments however, observers are required to fixate for unnaturally long periods of time. The 41 resulting long and monotonous experimental sessions can become especially problematic when 42 collecting data in a clinical setting, where time can be scarce and(More)
Surround suppression is a well-known example of contextual interaction in visual cortical neurophysiology, whereby the neural response to a stimulus presented within a neuron's classical receptive field is suppressed by surrounding stimuli. Human psychophysical reports present an obvious analog to the effects seen at the single-neuron level: stimuli are(More)
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