Anna J. Ruff

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In the second segment of this three-part review of parasitic infections of the central nervous system in children, we consider parasitic infections which typically involve various tissues and organs in addition to the brain and spinal cord. Parasites capable of dissemination in immunocompetent hosts are discussed first, and, as in Part I, organisms are(More)
Maternal-infant transmission of HIV-1 occurs in 13-40% of pregnancies. Studies on transmission of maternal immunity to HIV antigens have used antigens from viruses not representative of clinical isolates and have been conflicting. Using a consensus peptide sequence based on HIV isolates found in Haiti, we found that Haitian mothers who transmitted infection(More)
Mutational events as well as the selection of the optimal variant are essential steps in the evolution of living organisms. The same principle is used in laboratory to extend the natural biodiversity to obtain better catalysts for applications in biomanufacturing or for improved biopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, single mutation in genes of drug-metabolizing(More)
In the last part of this three-part review of parasitic infections of the central nervous system in children, we consider parasites which due to their size, distribution, or the nature of the host response, tend to cause focal lesions in the brain and spinal cord and therefore present as space-occupying lesions which occasionally mimic malignant tumors. As(More)
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