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T he excitement of scientifi c research and discovery cannot be fully conveyed by didactic lectures alone. Several recent initiatives and proposals, therefore, have supported a more participatory, discovery-based instruction for undergraduate science education [1,2]. In functional genomics, we have found an ideal platform to simultaneously benefi t students(More)
Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can lead to development of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in a subset of infected subjects. HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) gene has a critical role in HTLV-1 infectivity and the development of ATL and HAM/TSP.(More)
Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infects an estimated 15-20 million persons worldwide. A number of diseases have been associated with the virus including adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-I uveitis, and HTLV-I-associated infective dermatitis. Once it was shown that there is an(More)
Quantitative differences in antibody responses between normal donors HAM/TSP patients, asymptomatic carriers, and ATL patients from Jamaica: can they be used to estimate risk of disease? Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) are caused by HTLV-I infection. In these patients, the antibody(More)
Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type I (HTLV-I) infects an estimated 15-20 million persons worldwide. A number of diseases have been associated with this virus including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic parapar-esis (HAM/TSP), HLTV-I uveitis, and HTLV-I–asso-ciated infective dermatitis. The screening process for(More)
T he excitement of scientific research and discovery cannot be fully conveyed by didactic lectures alone. Several recent initiatives and proposals, therefore, have supported a more participatory, discovery-based instruction for undergraduate science education [1,2]. In functional genomics, we have found an ideal platform to simultaneously benefit students(More)
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