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Striatal structures form critical nodes of multiple circuits that are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and alcoholism. Here, we examined the separate and combined effects of schizophrenia and alcoholism and effects of medication type and drinking recency on striatal volumes. Accordingly, we measured caudate nucleus, putamen, and nucleus(More)
BACKGROUND Striatal structures are involved in dopaminergic alcohol reward mechanisms and aspects of motor control. Basal forebrain structures hold cholinergic mechanisms influencing memory formation, vulnerable to chronic alcoholism; however, alcoholism's effect on volumes of these structures has seldom been considered with in vivo measurement. METHODS(More)
OBJECTIVE Postmortem and in vivo brain imaging studies have identified abnormalities in the thalamus and the pons in both schizophrenia and alcoholism. The authors sought to determine whether patients with both schizophrenia and alcohol dependence would manifest exaggerated volume deficits in either structure. METHOD Volumetric measures of the left and(More)
Abnormalities of cerebellar structure and function, long recognized as a hallmark of chronic alcohol abuse, have also occasionally been noted in patients with schizophrenia. We used a four-point rating scale to assess clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction in men meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia (N=34) and alcohol dependence (N=15) as well as(More)
Alcoholics often suffer from motor incoordination resulting from alcohol­related cerebellar damage. However, the effect of cerebellar structural damage on cognitive functioning has not been clearly demonstrated. It is not known if the relationships observed between cerebellar damage and functional impairments persist with abstinence from alcohol. Cell death(More)
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