Anil K. Jain

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  • A K Jain
  • The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British…
  • 2010
The dismal outcome of tuberculosis of the spine in the pre-antibiotic era has improved significantly because of the use of potent antitubercular drugs, modern diagnostic aids and advances in surgical management. MRI allows the diagnosis of a tuberculous lesion, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 88%, well before deformity develops. Neurological(More)
The problems in infected nonunion include multiple sinuses, osteomyelitis, bone and soft tissue loss, osteopenia, adjacent joint stiffness, complex deformities, limb-length inequalities, and multidrug-resistant polybacterial infection. Bone gap and active infection are the crucial factors relating to treatment and prognosis. Gaps larger than 4 cm likely(More)
We analyzed 124 papers published in the English language literature to define the indications and timing of surgery in spinal TB and to evaluate the outcome of various surgical procedures for kyphosis and neural outcome. Surgery in spinal tuberculosis is indicated for diagnostic dilemma, neural complications, and prevention of kyphosis progression. Up to(More)
  • Anil K Jain
  • Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • 2002
Neurologic complications are the most dreaded complication of spinal tuberculosis. The patients who have paraplegia develop in the active stage of tuberculosis of the spine require active treatment for spinal tuberculosis and have a better prognosis than the patients who have paraplegia develop many years after the initial disease has healed. Neurologic(More)
BACKGROUND The diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis is clinico-radiological in endemic areas. However every patient does not have the classical picture. Osteoarticular tuberculosis is a paucibacillary disease hence bacteriological diagnosis is possible in 10-30% of the cases. The present study is undertaken to correlate clinico-radiological,(More)
Spinal deformity and paraplegia/quadriplegia are the most common complications of tuberculosis (TB) of spine. TB of dorsal spine almost always produces kyphosis while cervical and lumbar spine shows reversal of lordosis to begin with followed by kyphosis. kyphosis continues to increase in adults when patients are treated nonoperatively or by surgical(More)
Spinal tuberculosis (TB) produces neurological complications and grotesque spinal deformity, which in children increases even with treatment and after achieving healing. Long-standing, severe deformity leads to painful costo-pelvic impingement, respiratory distress, risk of developing late-onset paraplegia and consequent reduction in quality and longevity(More)
There is no consensus about the best option of internal fixation for unstable intertrochanteric fractures. The aim of the present study was to compare proximal femoral nail (PFN) with contralateral reverse distal femoral locking compression plate (reverse-DFLCP) in the management of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with compromised lateral wall. In a(More)
Late-onset paraplegia is best avoided by correcting severe kyphosis in the active, healing, or healed stages of spinal tuberculosis. We report 16 patients with dorsal or dorsolumbar spinal TB--nine with paraplegia, seven without paraplegia--who underwent kyphus correction. Nine patients had active, five partially treated, and two healed disease. The(More)