Angélique Levoye

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One-third of the approximately 400 nonodorant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are still orphans. Although a considerable number of these receptors are likely to transduce cellular signals in response to ligands that remain to be identified, they may also have ligand-independent functions. Several members of the GPCR family have been shown to modulate(More)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well-known drug targets. However, a question mark remains for the more than 100 orphan GPCRs as current deorphanisation strategies failed to identify specific ligands for these receptors. Recent advances have shown that orphan GPCRs may have important functions that are ligand-independent. Orphan GPCRs can modulate(More)
The CXCL12gamma chemokine arises by alternative splicing from Cxcl12, an essential gene during development. This protein binds CXCR4 and displays an exceptional degree of conservation (99%) in mammals. CXCL12gamma is formed by a protein core shared by all CXCL12 isoforms, extended by a highly cationic carboxy-terminal (C-ter) domain that encompass four(More)
Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the(More)
The CXCL12c chemokine arises by alternative splicing from Cxcl12, an essential gene during development. This protein binds CXCR4 and displays an exceptional degree of conservation (99%) in mammals. CXCL12c is formed by a protein core shared by all CXCL12 isoforms, extended by a highly cationic carboxy-terminal (C-ter) domain that encompass four overlapped(More)
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