Angèle Nalbandian

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Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget’s disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is a progressive, fatal genetic disorder with variable penetrance, predominantly affecting three main tissue types: muscle (IBM), bone (PDB), and brain (FTD). IBMPFD is caused by mutations in the ubiquitously expressed valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene,(More)
Valosin containing protein (VCP) disease associated with inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in Valosin containing protein gene. To establish genotype-phenotype correlations we analyzed clinical and biochemical markers from a database of 190 members(More)
Dominant mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). We have generated a knock-in mouse model with the common R155H mutation. Mice demonstrate progressive muscle weakness starting approximately at the age of 6 months. Histology of mutant(More)
Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause hereditary Inclusion body myopathy (hIBM) associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), more recently termed multisystem proteinopathy (MSP). Affected individuals exhibit scapular winging and die from progressive muscle weakness, and cardiac and respiratory failure,(More)
Pathological features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) include, in addition to selective motor neuron (MN) degeneration, the occurrence of protein aggregates, mitochondrial dysfunction and astrogliosis. SOD1 mutations cause rare familial forms of ALS and have provided the most widely studied animal models. Relatively recent studies implicating another(More)
Introduction—Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (hIBM) associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More recently they have been linked to 2% of familial ALS cases. A knock-in mouse model offers the opportunity to study VCP-associated pathogenesis. Methods—The(More)
Mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been implicated as an underlying factor to several common neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Valosin containing protein (VCP)-associated multisystem proteinopathy is a new hereditary disorder associated with inclusion body myopathy, Paget(More)
Valosin containing protein (VCP) mutations are the cause of hereditary inclusion body myopathy, Paget’s disease of bone, frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). VCP gene mutations have also been linked to 2% of isolated familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). VCP is at the intersection of disrupted ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy pathways, mechanisms(More)
Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene on chromosome 9p12-13. Patients demonstrate limb girdle muscle weakness, which eventually progresses to involve respiratory muscles, and death from respiratory(More)
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11-15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity, and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may(More)