Andy P. Beardmore

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Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of massive stars. Previous early optical observations of even the most exceptional GRBs (990123 and 030329) lacked both the temporal resolution to probe the(More)
Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions--supernovae--that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Historically, supernovae were discovered mainly through their 'delayed' optical light (some days after the burst of neutrinos that marks the actual event), preventing observations in the first moments following the explosion.(More)
Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have provided important clues to the nature of these massive explosive events, providing direct information on the nearby environment and indirect information on the central engine that powers the burst. We report the discovery of two bright x-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy(More)
We present observations of the early X-ray emission for a sample of 40 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) obtained using the Swift satellite, for which the narrow-field instruments were pointed at the burst within 10 minutes of the trigger. Using data from the Burst Alert Telescope and the X-Ray Telescope, we show that the X-ray light curve can be well described by an(More)
G. Tagliaferri, M. Goad, G. Chincarini, A. Moretti, S. Campana, D. N. Burrows, M. Perri, S. D. Barthelmy, N. Gehrels, H. Krimm, T. Sakamoto, P. Kumar, P. I. Mészáros, S. Kobayashi, B. Zhang, L. Angelini, P. Banat, A. P. Beardmore, M. Capalbi, S. Covino, G. Cusumano, P. Giommi, O. Godet, J. E. Hill, J. A. Kennea, V. Mangano, D. C. Morris, J. A. Nousek, P. T.(More)
Until recently, X-ray flares during the afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were a rarely detected phenomenon; thus, their nature is unclear. During the afterglow of GRB 050502B, the largest X-ray flare ever recorded rose rapidly above the afterglow light curve detected by the SwiftX-Ray Telescope. The peak flux of the flare was >500 times that of the(More)
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) come in two classes: long (> 2 s), soft-spectrum bursts and short, hard events. Most progress has been made on understanding the long GRBs, which are typically observed at high redshift (z approximately 1) and found in subluminous star-forming host galaxies. They are likely to be produced in core-collapse explosions of massive stars.(More)
GRB 050911, discovered by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope, was not seen 4.6 hr later by the Swift X-ray Telescope, making it one of the very few X-ray non-detections of a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow at early times. The γ-ray light-curve shows at least three peaks, the first two of which (∼T0 − 0.8 and T0 + 0.2 s, where T0 is the trigger time) were(More)
Supermassive black holes have powerful gravitational fields with strong gradients that can destroy stars that get too close, producing a bright flare in ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions from stellar debris that forms an accretion disk around the black hole. The aftermath of this process may have been seen several times over the past two decades in the(More)
We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i′ and z′ bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to(More)