Andrzej T Slominski

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Cutaneous melanin pigment plays a critical role in camouflage, mimicry, social communication, and protection against harmful effects of solar radiation. Melanogenesis is under complex regulatory control by multiple agents interacting via pathways activated by receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms, in hormonal, auto-, para-, or intracrine fashion.(More)
The skin is a known target organ for the proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), beta-endorphin, and ACTH and also a source of these peptides. Skin expression levels of the POMC gene and POMC/corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) peptides are not static but are determined by such factors as the(More)
Skin, the body's largest organ, is strategically located at the interface with the external environment where it detects, integrates, and responds to a diverse range of stressors including solar radiation. It has already been established that the skin is an important peripheral neuro-endocrine-immune organ that is tightly networked to central regulatory(More)
It was recently discovered that mammalian skin can produce serotonin and transform it into melatonin. Pathways for the biosynthesis and biodegradation of serotonin and melatonin have been characterized in human and rodent skin and in their major cellular populations. Moreover, receptors for serotonin and melatonin receptors are expressed in keratinocytes,(More)
Everyone knows and seems to agree that melanocytes are there to generate melanin - an intriguing, but underestimated multipurpose molecule that is capable of doing far more than providing pigment and UV protection to skin (1). What about the cell that generates melanin, then? Is this dendritic, neural crest-derived cell still serving useful (or even(More)
The discovery of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or CRH defining the upper regulatory arm of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, along with the identification of the corresponding receptors (CRFRs 1 and 2), represents a milestone in our understanding of central mechanisms regulating body and local homeostasis. We focused on the CRF-led(More)
Many of melatonin's actions are mediated through interaction with the G-protein coupled membrane bound melatonin receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2, respectively) or, indirectly with nuclear orphan receptors from the RORα/RZR family. Melatonin also binds to the quinone reductase II enzyme, previously defined the MT3 receptor. Melatonin receptors are(More)
There is evidence that L-tyrosine and L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), besides serving as substrates and intermediates of melanogenesis, are also bioregulatory agents acting not only as inducers and positive regulators of melanogenesis but also as regulators of other cellular functions. These can be mediated through action on specific receptors or through(More)
The classical observations of the skin as a target for melanotropins have been complemented by the discovery of their actual production at the local level. In fact, all of the elements controlling the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis are expressed in the skin including CRH, urocortin, and POMC, with its products ACTH, alpha-MSH, and(More)
Studies in mammalian skin have shown expression of the genes for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the related urocortin peptide, with subsequent production of the respective peptides. Recent molecular and biochemical analyses have further revealed the presence of CRH receptors (CRH-Rs). These CRH-Rs are functional, responding to CRH and urocortin(More)