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Glucocorticoids (GCs), which are used in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, inhibit the expression of many inflammatory mediators. They can also induce the expression of dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1; otherwise known as mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] phosphatase 1), which dephosphorylates and inactivates MAPKs. We(More)
There is a broad consensus that glucocorticoids (GCs) exert anti-inflammatory effects largely by inhibiting the function of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and consequently the transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. In contrast, side effects are thought to be largely dependent on GC-induced gene expression. Biochemical and genetic evidence suggests that(More)
Developing sympathetic neurons depend on NGF for survival. When sympathetic neurons are deprived of NGF in vitro, a well documented series of events, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway activation, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, and caspase activation, culminates in the death of the neuron by apoptosis within 24-48 h. This(More)
The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway has been strongly implicated in many of the processes that underlie the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For many years it has been considered a promising target for development of new anti-inflammatory drugs with which to treat RA and other chronic immune-mediated inflammatory(More)
OBJECTIVE Tissue glucocorticoid (GC) levels are regulated by the GC-activating enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1). This enzyme is expressed in cells and tissues arising from mesenchymal stromal cells. Proinflammatory cytokines dramatically increase expression of 11β-HSD1 in stromal cells, an effect that has been implicated in(More)
IL-10 plays a central nonredundant role in limiting inflammation in vivo. However, the mechanisms involved remain to be resolved. Using primary human macrophages, we found that IL-10 inhibits selected inflammatory genes, primarily at a level of transcription. At the TNF gene, this occurs not through an inhibition of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment(More)
Transcriptional noise is known to play a crucial role in heterogeneity in bacteria and yeast. Mammalian macrophages are known to exhibit cell-to-cell variation in their responses to pathogens, but the source of this heterogeneity is not known. We have developed a detailed stochastic model of gene expression that takes into account scaling effects due to(More)
Dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) 1 dephosphorylates and inactivates members of the MAPK superfamily, in particular, JNKs, p38α, and p38β MAPKs. It functions as an essential negative regulator of innate immune responses, hence disruption of the Dusp1 gene renders mice extremely sensitive to a wide variety of experimental inflammatory challenges. The(More)
In myeloid cells, the mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin (TTP) is induced and extensively phosphorylated in response to LPS. To investigate the role of two specific phosphorylations, at serines 52 and 178, we created a mouse strain in which those residues were replaced by nonphosphorylatable alanine residues. The mutant form of TTP was(More)