Andrew Merryweather

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BACKGROUND Many factors can affect a surgeon's performance in the operating room; these may include surgeon comfort, ergonomics of tool handle design, and fatigue. A laparoscopic tool handle designed with ergonomic considerations (pistol grip) was tested against a current market tool with a traditional pinch grip handle. The goal of this study is to(More)
BACKGROUND Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. METHODS/DESIGN A multi-center prospective cohort study was(More)
 Training, consultation, workflow design, and process/tool design emphasizing the ergonomic and biomechanical analysis of occupational hazards to reduce worker injuries.
BACKGROUND This study's objective was to quantify exposure-response relationships between job physical exposure (JPE) and incidence of lateral epicondylitis (LE). METHODS A cohort of 536 workers was enrolled from 10 manufacturing facilities and followed monthly for 6 years to ascertain changes in JPE and health status. JPE was individually measured and(More)
Occupational back pain and injury are common and costly issues. Biomechanical models are often used to quantify job risk by estimating back muscle forces. In general, the most accurate models are also the most complex, creating demand for models that are both straightforward and accurate. An existing, basic hand-calculation back compressive force estimation(More)
Improvement of current biomechanical models through implementation of a dynamic factor may provide greater accuracy in acquiring more realistic calculations of back compressive force (BCF) in the spine during lifting. Most widely used biomechanical models for job evaluations in industry are simplified and considered " static " models. These models neglect(More)
OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between the revised NIOSH lifting equation (RNLE) and risk of low-back pain (LBP). BACKGROUND The RNLE is commonly used to quantify job physical stressors to the low back from lifting and/or lowering of loads. There is no prospective study on the relationship between RNLE and LBP that includes(More)
OBJECTIVES To determine the feasibility of predicting static and dynamic peak back-compressive forces based on (1) static back compressive force values at the lift origin and destination and (2) lifting speed. METHODS Ten male subjects performed symmetric mid-sagittal floor-to-shoulder, floor-to-waist, and waist-to-shoulder lifts at three different speeds(More)
BACKGROUND Few prospective cohort studies of workplace low back pain (LBP) with quantified job physical exposure have been performed. There are few prospective epidemiological studies for LBP occupational risk factors and reported data generally have few adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. METHODS/DESIGN A multi-center prospective(More)
OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the revised NIOSH lifting equation (RNLE) and risk of seeking care for low-back pain (SC-LBP). BACKGROUND The RNLE is commonly used to quantify low-back physical stressors from lifting/lowering of loads in workplaces. There is no prospective study on relationship between RNLE and(More)