Andrew McCallum

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We present conditional random fields , a framework for building probabilistic models to segment and label sequence data. Conditional random fields offer several advantages over hidden Markov models and stochastic grammars for such tasks, including the ability to relax strong independence assumptions made in those models. Conditional random fields also avoid(More)
Recent approaches to text classification have used two different first-order probabilistic models for classification, both of which make the naive Bayes assumption. Some use a multi-variate Bernoulli model, that is, a Bayesian Network with no dependencies between words and binary word features (e.g. Larkey and Croft 1996; Koller and Sahami 1997). Others use(More)
Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are a powerful probabilistic tool for modeling sequential data, and have been applied with success to many text-related tasks, such as part-of-speech tagging, text segmentation and information extraction. In these cases, the observations are usually modeled as multinomial distributions over a discrete vocabulary, and the HMM(More)
This paper presents an LDA-style topic model that captures not only the low-dimensional structure of data, but also how the structure changes over time. Unlike other recent work that relies on Markov assumptions or discretization of time, here each topic is associated with a continuous distribution over timestamps, and for each generated document, the(More)
Many important problems involve clustering large datasets. Although naive implementations of clustering are computationally expensive, there are established efficient techniques for clustering when the dataset has either (1) a limited number of clusters, (2) a low feature dimensionality, or (3) a small number of data points. However, there has been much(More)
This paper shows how a text classifier’s need for labeled training documents can be reduced by taking advantage of a large pool of unlabeled documents. We modify the Query-by-Committee (QBC) method of active learning to use the unlabeled pool for explicitly estimating document density when selecting examples for labeling. Then active learning is combined(More)
Models for many natural language tasks benefit from the flexibility to use overlapping, non-independent features. For example, the need for labeled data can be drastically reduced by taking advantage of domain knowledge in the form of word lists, part-of-speech tags, character ngrams, and capitalization patterns. While it is difficult to capture such(More)
This paper presents an active learning method that directly optimizes expected future error. This is in contrast to many other popular techniques that instead aim to reduce version space size. These other methods are popular because for many learning models, closed form calculation of the expected future error is intractable. Our approach is made feasible(More)
1.1 Introduction Relational data has two characteristics: first, statistical dependencies exist between the entities we wish to model, and second, each entity often has a rich set of features that can aid classification. For example, when classifying Web documents, the page's text provides much information about the class label, but hyperlinks define a(More)